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Thread: V6 Oil Sump Replacement, the guide!

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    Super Moderator Ian D's Avatar
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    V6 Oil Sump Replacement, the guide!

    Right as promised, this is how I did the Oil Sump replacement on my car as mine had cracked, mine is a 3.0L v6 2004.5MY estate, I don’t know if there are any minor differences with newer or older model years.

    Parts you will need
    Oil Sump, (I got this 2nd hand, £50. It’s £349 new from Jaguar!)
    Accessory Belt (£38 from dealers)
    Oil (5w30 full synthetic, 6 Litres, £30 Castrol magnatec)
    Oil filter and new oil sump plug £8.
    Oil Sump gasket (£29 from eBay)
    Gasket sealant (I used Loctite high temp gasket sealant)

    A free set of ramps was a great help!


    Preparation
    First of all make sure you spray all the nuts on the exhaust the day before you start with rust repellent and leave to settle. This will help you out a lot, then Jack up the car and remove the driver’s side wheel, you’ll find out why shortly.

    Remove transfer box air duct, it’s just a 10mm bolt and then unclip the other end out.
    Remove oil sump plug and let the oil drain out completely, remove oil filter too.

    Engine bay
    All I removed from the engine bay was the oil cap and dipstick

    Accessory belt
    I removed the old one by just cutting it off!

    Exhaust
    This was a major pain as the nuts on the exhaust were beginning to fuse to the exhaust itself and had rusted from a 15mm nut to an imperial measure. A 3ft breaker bar was very helpful on the flexi section, then pull this off and out of the way.

    Next undo the 15mm nut that’s on the clamp of the front catalyst converter, just loosen this, do not remove it. Undo the 2 x 15mm nuts that hold the front part of the exhaust and the rear downpipe together.

    The next part is tricky, looking into the wheel arch area you’ll see a heat shield just in front of the steering rack, undo the 10mm nut that keeps this in place. This will give you more room to put a 15mm spanner onto the nut that holds the exhaust downpipe to the rear cat. I used a 15mm ring spanner and a longer spanner on that locked together to provide some leverage as it was very tight at first. This will take a while to do, you only need to loosen this nut, do not take the nut off as you’ll be there for years.

    Once all the above nuts are off, pull and turn the thing until the exhaust pulls off, it should all just drop and then place the two parts to one side.

    Oil Sump

    There is what appears to be some sort of thick metal circle on the front part of the sump, this will need cutting off altogether for you to remove the sump out away from the sub frame.

    There is what some people call the unobtanium bolt on the oil sump of these, it’s very tricky to get to and almost impossible some might say. There are a few methods, they are:


    • Remove the whole Transfer Box out the way
    • Drill through bolt hole of Transfer Box and remove bolt
    • Create a Frankenstein spanner, cut bolt then insert a smaller one.


    I chose to do the second one on the list as it was a good way of saving time, it took me 2 hours to drill a hole for a 13mm socket to fit onto the bolt. I first removed the bolt going through to the transfer box, then drilled a guide hole and just kept on making the hole larger till it fit, be very careful where you drill, if you do go with this method, I am in no way responsible for how crazy you are with a drill!



    Once the unobtanium bolt is out, there are 19 bolts in total that you need to remove from the sump and a black plastic cover over the flywheel/torque converter depending on what you have, this cover is also hiding two sump bolts.

    The sump itself is 13 small and 2 large bolts, the AC compressor has 2 very long bolts at an angle going into the sump, you may need to undo the bumper undertray to get these out completely. Just look straight up and start undoing them in a clockwise fashion. There are also 2 x 15mm bolts going into the gearbox through the sump. There is another plate that is bolted to the gearbox and front catalyst, you won’t be able to remove this bolt, just undo it and swing the whole plate up above the cat itself. There is another 15mm bolt which is adjacent to the oil sump plug which is also bolted into a re-enforcement panel of some sort, just locate the 10mm bolts and remove the whole black panel.

    Once all this is out, the sump itself will be about ready to remove, it will be very awkward as the oil pickup is quite large and goes down quite far into the sump. Just keep turning and twisting it and eventually it will just come out. Then pull away the gasket itself from the bottom end of the engine.

    Clean up
    I cleaned both edges of the bottom end and the new oil sump, using gasket remover. To make the sump fit in much easier I did some cutting. I removed the same metal circle lump that I cut off the old one and also removed a useless metal part that was sticking out the rear of the sump that did nothing apart from being annoying at getting the thing back in, don’t worry they are in no way needed for the benefit of the sump.

    Take the sump and do some dry runs getting the sump back in the easiest way you can, once you are happy, I then applied Loctite high temp gasket sealant to the oil sump and the gasket for a good seal.

    I held the sump and gasket to the bottom end, whilst my friend then put a few bolts back in finger tight, it really is just a reversal of what was removed. All the bolts that go into the bottom end straight into engine are torqued to 25NM, I did this in a criss-cross action going tighter up to the 25NM on the last turn.

    Remember to re-fit the belt, I used a 3/8 ratchet with the end grinded down to fit as there is hardly room to fit otherwise to fit onto the belt tensioner, whilst I was applying force onto that, my friend slipped the belt over the crankshaft pulley.



    Once everything is back in, treat the engine to brand new oil and filter and once enough has been put in to register at least min on the dipstick, run the engine. Then stand back and watch your amazing new dry sump and gasket in action!

    With all parts and new oil etc., this cost £155 and 15 hours of my time, enjoy!

    Last edited by 12RM; 06-05-13 at 04:47. Reason: Made sticky
    Jaguar XK Coupe 4.2 2006 (2007 MY) in indigo blue, 16 way seats, slate blue/ivory interior, Portfolio mats, 19" Carelia alloys, keyless entry, 2014/15 sat nav DVD update.
    Mods: Power-fold door mirrors, ally weave dash trim, updated chrome stalks, XKR pedals, ACM kit, Speedpack Spoiler, XKR exhaust, late model seat and window switches, Alston Suede roof lining, Upper/Lower Mesh grilles, Redstuff pads all round.
    Resident Super Moderator.
    V6 X-Type Oil Sump Replacement Guide


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  3. #2
    OriginalCaruso
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    This has got to be worthy of preserving!

    Nice one Ian

  4. #3
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    16 mm counter sink goes threw the transfer case spot on and take about an hour.

  5. #4
    Super Moderator Ian D's Avatar
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    Glad it helped another Jag driver.
    Jaguar XK Coupe 4.2 2006 (2007 MY) in indigo blue, 16 way seats, slate blue/ivory interior, Portfolio mats, 19" Carelia alloys, keyless entry, 2014/15 sat nav DVD update.
    Mods: Power-fold door mirrors, ally weave dash trim, updated chrome stalks, XKR pedals, ACM kit, Speedpack Spoiler, XKR exhaust, late model seat and window switches, Alston Suede roof lining, Upper/Lower Mesh grilles, Redstuff pads all round.
    Resident Super Moderator.
    V6 X-Type Oil Sump Replacement Guide


  6. #5
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    I am just drilling out for my sump removal now, just waiting on a friend for a bigger drill bit to accommodate the socket size I need, but it drills through really easy with a good drillbit, I had used 3 different sizes so far and go it through in about 15 minutes just need the forth size now to finish the hole, great guide you have written it is very helpful thankyou.

  7. Likes Ian D liked this post

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