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Thread: Odd Helicopter Noise 01 XJR

  1. #21
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    Yep, managed to drop the frame out at a slight angle which gave me enough clearance to retract the driveshaft. Right pain!

  2. #22
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    New diff is in the frame now, so it's just a case of getting it back into the car. Absolute pig of a job this. I've not taken photos unfortunately, but I'll do a fully detailed writeup when I'm done for anyone else that's brave enough to try. Few bits missing from other instructions that are out there.

    Slightly concerned that when playing with the old diff I couldn't identify any clunks or anything, but I suppose turning by hand doesn't generate nearly enough force. Oil looks OK too with no noticeable metal. It was however much, much harder to turn than the new one, which glides nicely.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Jimbov8's Avatar
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    As long as you get it fixed, that’s the main thing.
    Jim.
    2009 XK 5.0L PortfolioPast:-87'XJS 3.6L, 93'XJ40 3.2L gold, 95'XJ6 4.0L sport, 00'XJ8 3.2L sport, 2005 XK8 4.2L coupe in that order and enjoyed all of 'em.

    I do not offer advice, I only say what I would do with the set of circumstances presented. Your choice always.

  4. #24
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    Indeed! All going OK now though.

    Further messing with the old diff has revealed a definite clunk at one point of the rotation though, which has put my mind at rest. Sounds almost like something dropping inside with each revolution.

  5. #25
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    Very close to being done now. Getting everything lined up as it goes back into the car is, as with every other part of this job, a right faff. Lots of jiggling about, loosening and tightening. Currently have the subframe in at one side and the bracket in at both sides at the back, but the subframe on the other side about half an inch out of alignment. Typical! I'll get there eventually.

  6. #26
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    Finally finished swapping over the diff this weekend! It is a pig of a job (but entirely doable) and I think given the time it took me I wish I’d just had a garage do it, but for anyone in the future who wants to give it a go here are some more detailed instructions.

    I highly recommend you have a second person (as I did) to help you for most of this, especially when lowering and installing the subframe. I did this in my driveway with a normal set of jacks, stands, wood and dollies. There are no particular surprises tool wise but ones I needed and did not have include: extra deep 13mm socket, 24mm socket and Irwin bolt grips. A crowbar/pry bar is very useful too. I used two wooden dollies from toolstation, which at 12 quid each are absolutely brilliant.

    All the below was done with the car on two 2 tonne stands at the designated rear jacking points extended to about 450mm. I also had another two stands supporting the car just a little further inward from the jacking points, with wood used to spread the weight. Almost certainly overkill but I like to have as many backups as possible.

    Removal/installation from car:

    1. Support entirety of rear subframe. I used a jack and a variety of stands for this. There’s plenty of space to put them, but I kept the jack and stands in the very centre and at the very edge, which allowed me to lower the whole thing down onto two dollies. So from one side to the other it was stand, dolly, jack & stand, dolly, stand. Given the height required for this job, you’ll very likely need blocks of wood to place between jack and car.

    2. Remove the three bolts that attach the jurid coupling (rubber doughnut) to the diff input. This is a bit of a pain as you’ll need to be right under the car, but not too bad if you can get the car up high enough. You’re then supposed to be able to simply retract the propshaft off the diff input, but this didn’t work on mine as it wouldn’t retract far enough (see later instructions). You’ll need the car in neutral and the handbrake off to rotate the propshaft.

    3. Remove handbrake cable at the adjustment point. I also removed the handbrake bracket further down where the middle of the propshaft is, so that the propshaft could angle downwards. You won’t need to do this if you can get the propshaft off the diff while in situ.

    4.Remove wheels and brake calipers. Won’t bother with any detail here.

    5. Remove brackets at each side of the subframe that attach it to the chassis. Four large bolts on each side, and these ones were very straightforward for me.

    6. Undo the nuts that hold the top of the shock tower to the car. The double ended bolts sometimes come out entirely if the nuts are rusted but this doesn’t matter. You will need an extra deep 13mm socket for these as the bolt thread extends a good inch past the nut on some of them.

    7. Remove the w-shaped frame at the back of the diff that connects it to the car. There are four bolts/bushes, one at each corner, and either the top two or the bottom two need removing. The workshop manual shows the top ones being removed, but these completely rounded on mine, so I removed the bottom two. You will need some upward pressure on the subframe to get these out.

    8. The diff/subframe structure will now be almost completely disconnected, so you can begin lowering it. Once it’s dropped about 6 inches or so, you’ll need to unbolt the exhaust hanger bushes on either side which are on top of the front of the diff. If you have CATS, you’ll also need to disconnect the plug from the top of the shock towers.

    9. As I couldn’t get the propshaft to retract in situ, I had to slowly lower the whole thing down at an angle until I could get it to pop off. Then lower the whole thing down onto dollies, which allows you to to roll the whole thing out from under the car to wherever you need.

    10. Re-fitting is just done in reverse order. It’s a bit of a pain getting things lined up but you’ll get there eventually.

    Swapping the diff:

    1. This bit is all fairly self explanatory, but essentially you’re dismantling almost everything you see in front of you. The only bolts that you don’t need to touch are the two big ones that join the suspension arms at the back of the diff, the UJ bolts at the hub, and the main hub nuts. I kept the whole thing on dollies throughout the process, with some rotation/tipping to get to certain bits.

    2. Remove the whole of the A-shaped subframe, the big tie bars, the four bolts on the diff side of the UJs, the front plate, and loosen the bolts on the knuckle of the wheel hub. You’ll see very clearly what needs to be done.

    3. You’ll also need to detach the handbrake cable and thread it through the front plate. The cable is split by pushing it together in the little joining bracket. Little metal tabs keep the cable from threading back through the faceplate, and these are just pushed up gently with a flathead to remove.

    4. The tricky part is the big o-shaped metal surround that goes on the front of the diff. It’s held in place by four rubber bushes tightly pressed on big bolts. Once you’ve got the nuts off (two are 24mm which is a relatively uncommon size), you will need a crowbar or similar to prize the bracket off the diff.

    5. The front plate is also a bit tricky, because you have to navigate the diff fl*nge through an almost circular hole that’s smaller than the diameter of the fl*nge. I spent 10 minutes trying to figure it out before the wife did it in 30 seconds.

    6. Installation is simply the reverse of removal. This took me only around an hour, but it can be a bit difficult to get the diff bolts back through those rubber bushes on the o-shaped frame as it’s so heavy. Some manhandling and a rubber mallet came in handy. Tightening up the bolts on the UJ is easiest when the diff/subframe is back in the car, as you can put the handbrake on to prevent the UJ turning.

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