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Thread: Chuck's Jaguar D Type Build

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    Chuck's Jaguar D Type Build

    D Type Blog. The Question.

    I have a question.

    I just took delivery of an RCR Jaguar D Type kit. A detailed build blog will be forthcoming that will likely continue for a couple of years or longer, similar to the blog for the RCR GT40 started more than a decade ago at GT40s.com. https://www.gt40s.com/threads/chuck-...r-build.22083/

    But where should that blog be?

    The JaguarForum seems like a logical place, but appears to be focused more on those that drive production Jaguars rather than those that build reproductions. I don’t want to start a blog that will out of place.

    Of course only a handful of D Types were built and one is not likely to see an original driving down the street. So if you want to experience driving or even sitting in a D Type it will likely be a reproduction.

    So here is the question, for those that visit this forum and for those that administer it. Would it be appropriate to continue this blog on our construction of a D Type reproduction on the JaguarForum?


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    Senior Member Jimbov8's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum.

    I for one, would enjoy very much seeing and reading your build progress on this forum and as it’s Jaguar related, I’m sure the moderator and admin would have no objections to it either.

    Good luck with the project.
    Jim.
    2012 XKR Black pack, Speed Pack, Aero pack, Rat pack. Past:-87'XJS 3.6L, 93'XJ40 3.2L gold, 95'XJ6 4.0L sport, 00'XJ8 3.2L sport, 2005 XK8 4.2L coupe, 2009 XK 5.0L Portfolio in that order and enjoyed all of 'em.

    I do not offer advice, I only say what I would do with the set of circumstances presented. Your choice always.

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    Senior Member Super350's Avatar
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    Yup, me too.
    I'd enjoy watching this develop.

    Hope the build goes well.
    Simon.
    2003 Super V8 SWB

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    Senior Member fat controller's Avatar
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    Appropriate? I would say it should be compulsory!

    Welcome to the forum, and I will definitely be watching your progress with great interest. Best of luck!
    ex - 2002 X-Type 2.5 V6; 1995 XJ Sport 3.2; 1998 Mercedes C180 Elegance; VW Passat 2.0TDI (140); Audi A4 Avant 2.0TDI; Nissan Qashqai 1.5dCi; Current - 2007 XJ 4.2 V8 Sovereign, and occasionally an Electric Wheelchair!

    It wasn't me! A big boy done it and ran away.

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    Delivery


    The Jag arrived on an unseasonably warm day in early October, 2018. The first project was to unpack the boxes and inspect everything.

    We learned that several key components including the door hinges, aluminum front clip vents and header tank are not yet available. But the hardware needed to seriously begin construction is there, so let the project begin!

    A detailed list of contents was prepared and compared to the RCR list. The slight discrepancies were brought to RCR’s attention. Preparing a list is good policy if for no other reason than it forces one to familiarize himself with everything that came with the kit.

    Photos, photos, photos. Photos were taken of virtually every part. You never know when you will need to revisit the original appearance of something, particular assembled chassis components.


    The fact the body is blue, fin white and fuel filler lid green is of no significance. It will all eventually be the same color.


    Details are noteworthy. The tail lights are actual Lucas components. The headlight has a small signal light within the housing, which will be useful, since the original small signal light was mounted just below the headlight likely was of little practical effect. I suspect we will wire both the internal and the small external light if for no other reason than to enhance its visibility.

    We requested our kit without the aluminum panels installed, so they were also laid out and examined. The panels are like a big puzzle. One has to study the notations written on them and figure out where they will go. The aluminum panels will finish off the cockpit, front clip and rear clip, adding significantly to the aesthetics of the final product.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC_0216.jpg   DSC_0214.jpg   DSC_0198.jpg  

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    Deleted. Duplicate.
    Last edited by CESLAW; 08-11-18 at 00:55.

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    The Engine Builder

    Bill Terry has been building Jaguar engines since the sixties. Before that he raced and worked on Triumph motorcycles. If you see an XKE competing in vintage races at Sebring, Road America, or other road courses there is a good chance it has an engine built by Bill. For many years he ran a Jaguar parts business know as Terry’s Jags. He sold that business about a decade ago and since that time his focus has been on one thing: building Jag engines. He presently operates under the name TT Engines, www.TTEngines.com, 618-513-0385. In his shop are pictures of some of the winning cars powered by his engines, including a MK2 that won the Touring Car competition in Japan in 2015, and E Types raced by Heritage Motorsports and Predator Performance.

    The engine is the heart of the D Type, so my goal was to build an engine that would look as close to the original as possible. I did some searching for a good engine builder before discovering that Bill Terry was only thirty miles away.

    Bill and his wife live in an old warehouse in Benton, Illinois. The top two floors have been converted into the living quarters and the ground floor is the engine shop. The actual engine building takes place in a small section of the first floor with a high ceiling, original hardwood floors, an antique roll top desk, and walls covered with pictures of winning race cars. Along the outside wall is a full-length work bench with drawers filled with tools. Typically, there are a couple of engines being built; an idyllic setting for building Jag power plants.

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    On one of my visits to Bill’s shop there were three engines lined up in various stages of completion. One looked a bit odd. The spacing of the cylinder heads seemed a bit off. It had a shallow oil pan with various attachments not seen on other Jag six cylinders. Noting my interest Bill commented in an off-hand manner that this particular engine was a D Type engine that was going into the 1956 Lemans winner. Now put this in perspective. There were only 84 original D Type race cars built. D Types won Lemans four years in a row in the late 1950’s. This engine was going into one of those four Lemans winners! By way of further explanation, that car was much too valuable to risk harming the original engine, so Bill was building a clone engine that could be swapped so it could actually be driven.

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    There are obviously an abundance of differences between an original D Type racing engine and the one that will go into our reproduction, even though they will look similar to all but the most knowledgeable. The most obvious difference is the spacing of the heads and the dry sump. But another detail was intriguing.The pulley on the water pump has a unique means of adjusting the belt tension. The pulley is in two halves that thread together. How tight or loose it is set determines whether the belt rides deep or near the outer edge, which in turn will loosen or tighten the belt. Once the tension is right, a set screw it tightened down to secure it. Bill commented that many less knowledgeable mechanics did not realize that there were detents in the threaded section where the set screw should be placed and they would often damage the threads making it difficult for the next guy to adjust the tension. This set up was unique to the D Type.

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    Long story short: after seeing what was going on in this shop only thirty miles from my garage I had no doubt that Bill Terry could build an excellent engine for my RCR Jag.

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