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Thread: xtype buying advice

  1. #11
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    Ok, just a few quick checks I can think of -

    Firstly, your mechanic is right. The 2.2D engine has a lot more grunt about it and in terms of economy, is VERY similar to the 2.0D. That being said, the 2.0D is no slouch. I'd sooner have a nicer 2.0D than a rougher 2.2D.

    Secondly, as much as I love my X-Type, please note that in my experience most garages hate them. Largely due to the fact that the engine bay is so badly designed (cramped) that replacing near anything is a horrible awkward job. Any repair in or around the engine will ALWAYS have an added price factor because of this.

    As a whole though, the X-type is both a very attractive alternative to an older X300 and (if you hunt) can provide exceptionally good value. Albeit watch out for excessively priced ones. I've loved mine ever since I had it.

    Common
    Run the car for 10-15 minutes and check the water temperature gauge - If it doesn't go to somewhere between 1/4 and just below half either the oil or water thermostat may be broken - sadly it can be either or both. Not a major problem (and not a lot to fix), but a faulty one may keep your engine in 'cold' mode.
    Water Pump - check the water level before turning on and then after 15-20 minutes warm running. If it's lost any (and I'm not talking a huge amount here), it may be indicative of a faulty water pump (not hugely expensive, but not cheap either). It's much more easier to spot with the engine floor plate off (as you get a small puddle), but this is impractical if you're buying one.
    Rear Suspension Mounts - Look under the rear wheels at the rear suspension mounts. These can often get very rusty. Not a major issue, but will be an MOT fail (not hugely expensive, but not cheap either).
    DPF - It's far more preferable to have an X-Type WITHOUT the DPF (as a previous poster said) - Generally the DPF gives you far more trouble than it's worth.
    Check all lights - Not a major factor, but X-Type (front) lights (and their fuses) are an absolutely b*stard to change. It's inevitable that you'll have to change a bulb eventually, but if one is gone, use it as a haggling point.
    Injectors - Take a long-headed screwdriver with you, turn the engine on and place the metal end on the injected and your ear on the other end. Listen to each of the injectors - you should hear a relatively quiet but solid tap-tap-tap-tap. If you don't, the injector may be faulty. Again, not hugely expensive, but certainly a common enough problem.
    EGR Hose - Find the EGR (usually in the bottom left corner of the engine bay. You'll find a big hose coming from the base. Have a rough feel of it for any tears or splits. Not a major job, but a ****** awkward one. Having a feel of the hose will give you an idea of just how awkward it is to get to to replace.
    Auxiliary Tensioner - If you don't know what this is, I won't bore you with the details. Rest assured, it's another component that is a fairly common issue and is a swine to get to. Easiest way to check for any problems is to turn the air conditioning on. The engine will make a little noise when this happens as the belt activates, but if the engine starts making a notably louder tapping noise then it will need replacing sooner or later.
    Doors - Open the doors and see how much resistance there is on the hand. A common issue is the cheap plastic 'clip' that holds the handle in place. A relatively easy fix, but something to note. If the handle (from the outside) feels spongey (or only feels to engage when nearly at the top) this might need sorting.
    Engine - I would always suggest on your test drive revving high and hard. Look in your rearview for excessive smoke blarts. While a diesel will always give off the occasional black shat on the road, it shouldn't CONSTANTLY do it. If it does, could be a number of issues best avoided.
    Front Tyres - Check if they are the same. While not a major problem mis-matched brands/variants can make the traction control and/or ABS a lot more sensitive. Remember - FRONT TYRES - Unless it's the AWD, the X-type (unlike most jaguars) is front wheel drive! If they don't match... HAGGLE!

    Good Questions To Ask

    Has the clutch/duel flywheel been changed? - Basically, a big design flaw that is often replaced with the much more reliable Ford Transit one (we don't talk about that).
    Has the EGR been cleaned recently? - The EGR valve is a hideous piece of technology that re-routes some exhaust fumes back through the engine to burn off a little extra nitrous oxide. The valve itself though, eventually, gets thick with soot. It's not a major point, but if it hasn't, the first thing I would do is remove it, clean it and then blank it off. Again though, blanking is problematic if the car has the DPF.
    Has it been anti-freezed? - Winter is coming.

    Other than this, all other basic checks. Rust, tyres (irregular wear).
    I've listed everything here I can think of as a 'relatively common' issue, but don't let the excessive nature but you off. While they do have their problems, when they run well, they're an absolute pleasure. Particularly the AWD models, but they are generally more expensive and a lot less economical. Additionally, just because the X-type shares a lot in common with the model-3 Mondeo, never think parts will be cheap or plentiful.

    A final caveat I always feel I should also add is to not be put off by overly high mileage. The diesel engine in the Jaguar X-type (either the 2.0D or 2.2D) is, despite some of the components fitted to it, exceptionally good and proven very solid well up to 200,000 miles. Coming back to a point I made earlier, I'd sooner have a X-type with 100,000+ miles that had clearly been well maintained than one 50,000 or lower that was much more questionable. Think about it, if it's been well used, it's probably been well maintained.
    Last edited by miquelsanchez; 09-11-18 at 16:28.

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  3. #12
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    Loving the detailed ‘how to check an X-Type’ guide. Many thanks.

    1 comment from me. My 2008 2.2D manual has done 27k miles since I bought it less than 4yrs ago (and 153k in total) and I have never touched the EGR value and never had an issue, so I’m leaving well alone 😀

  4. #13
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    Being a 2008 2.2, your X-type almost certainly does have a DPF, in which case blanking the EGR is a no-no anyway. Well, unless you like engine warning lights. You can get around this by drilling a small hole in the blanking plate, but generally you're better off keeping the EGR on.

    DESPITE all of that though, I'd honestly recommend cleaning the EGR at least every 2 years if you are using it. As it fills with soot it restricts air flow which can take more than a few HP off the engine.

    I'm not exaggerating when I say that when I bought my X-type, the valve ( which is about 3" in diameter) was caked in about an inch and a half of soot. I'd honestly put an EGR clean in the same bracket as tyres, oil, filters and all other general maintenance aspects. A clogged EGR will reduce performance and take a little off your MPG.

    It's an awkward job, but very possible for even someone with only basic car maintenance knowledge. I generally tend to recommend replacing the main hose at the same time (if you know it hasn't been changed before), a more modern (better quality) hose is only about £20 and with the EGR off, you're halfway there anyway.

    Take it off, remove as much of the deposits as you can, soak it in break cleaner/egr cleaner (honestly, either is fine) overnight, remove any excessive deposits, repeat the soak if necessary, leave to dry and re-fix. About 2-hours work. I know more than a few X-type owners who have 2 EGR valves simply so that they can be cleaned/changed at convenience.

  5. #14
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    Thanks and will consider your recommendation. As my car is manual, the dpf was an option and I haven’t yet determined whether it is there!

    Am sure it is a relatively easy job to remove and clean EGR, but am concerned that my actions could upset an engine that has never reported a fault code. Part of me is in the “if it ain’t broke...” mindset, yet if a quick clean enhances the engine performance in terms of smoothness and mpg (which seems pretty good to me anyway), then maybe I can be convinced...lol.

    I will need to read up on the removal process and make a decision. Would I need to get any new gasket seals when I re-fit the valve?

    PS, I wouldn’t tamper with the blanking plate in any way if I do remove and clean the valve as, once again, I have never had any issues.

  6. #15
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    I'm not going to lie, removing the EGR might expose or create some gremlins. For example, the metal pipe which leads to the engine can snap on the weld at the joint as it attached to the EGR (where you would blank it) - (this isn't likely if you're gentle) - or the main rubber hose (if brittle) could tear.

    Like cleaning an engine out, sometimes the soot is the only thing keeping an injector sealed and running, but in all honesty, if there are problems there, they're going to surface eventually (and probably when you really didn't want them to). Nothing quite like a 20 mile trip in limp mode to make you wish you'd checked something sooner

    No gaskets or parts needed with the only exception of the main EGR hose which, if old, can split but as above almost always happens sooner or later anyway. I've removed my EGR twice (for cleaning) before I decided, just for long-term security, to blank it and replace the hose (to never think of it again). The existing hose never split once. So replacing it was a personal choice.

    When it comes to the 'if it ain't broke' mentality, I get that entirely. With the EGR though, it's usually 'just because it ain't broken now doesn't mean it's fine...'

    Dirty clothes can be worn for days, doesn't mean it's doing you any good.

  7. #16
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    Hi all, thanks for the advice, greatly appreciated! So I test drove two 2008 xtypes today. The first 1 belonged to a jaguar mechanic (20 years experience), the car drove really well, new starter, clutch and flywheel on it), but was a bit weathered on the outside. The 2nd was a 2.2 auto sovereign, drove really well but had a slight bearing noise from the front wheel, full service history but with much nicer interior and exterior. I decided to purchase the 2.2 as when I was out test driving I contacted my local mechanic for advice. As my mechanic was gone on holidays, I ended up speaking to his lieutenant who coincidentally happens to be a big xtype fan (xtype owner himself). He was emphatic about the 2.2 version and to be fair, I really preferred the extra bit of power that it had. I'll probably drop the car over to him next week to have a look at it, as he seemed really keen to see it. Oddly, the fuel tank lid didn't work on both of the cars. I'm I correct to assume that this is a cable mechanism? How easy/difficult is it to get this issue sorted?

  8. #17
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    Is it the 2:2 auto sovereign you've bought, i've had mine for nearly 6 years now and have only needed a new battery and tyres.
    I find the 6 speed auto gearbox great and on this model they reckon it's better to replace the EGR valve than clean it.
    09 X Type 2-2 Auto Sovereign Ionian Blue, Ivory/Oyster

  9. #18
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    Good work rmb, glad you bought one you like, even better to have your mechanic on hand with his opinion.

    Steve1707 mentioned the DPF and 'not sure if he has one' ... forgive me but apparently it's difficult to miss if you look underneath, it's big enough! ... always assuming the interior filter hasn't been discarded of course (which is illegal and an MOT fail btw!).


    Also, I think you will know if the EGR needs a clean, just keep an eye on the smoke emissions, first port of call if you start chucking out smoke.


    Some rather scary comments from Miquel about mechanics hating the 'awkward' engine compartment. It is what it is, you shouldn't pay extra for inaccessibility and I've never had any complaints from my mechanics so I trust you'll have none from yours.

    Enjoy!
    2005 (55) X-type 2.0d S saloon ~ Zircon/Champagne/Belize.

  10. #19
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    Thanks Rowley. You are forgiven 😀. I know I need to look under the car, but was only advised where to look 2-3 weeks ago and haven’t got round to it...not a great excuse, I know, but as no issues with the car and a lot of urban journeys experiences without any dpf warning issues, it has not exactly been anywhere high up on my priority list of thing to do. I will endeavour to take a look this weekend if time and weather permits.

    Comments much appreciated.

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  12. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve1707 View Post
    Thanks Rowley. You are forgiven . I know I need to look under the car, but was only advised where to look 2-3 weeks ago and haven’t got round to it...not a great excuse, I know, but as no issues with the car and a lot of urban journeys experiences without any dpf warning issues, it has not exactly been anywhere high up on my priority list of thing to do. I will endeavour to take a look this weekend if time and weather permits.
    Comments much appreciated.
    You should check if you have a Diesel Particulate Filter, because if you have you should be using a Low Ash C1 Oil WSS M2C 934B this is the number of the oil that should be used and this number is not mentioned in the Handbook.
    When the DPFilter was fitted to the facelift x type, Jaguar didn't think about informing dealer's what oil should be used and they were asking Miller Oils which oil should be used. Because if you don't use a Low Ash C1 Oil they reckon that the DPFilter will get blocked sooner rather than later.
    It was Castrol that helped me to decide which oil to use as i got no help from jaguar. Dealer's not using the proper oil is maybe the cause off owner's having trouble with the DPFilter. When i got my x type 2013 I got a estimate for a service from a jaguar dealer and the engine oil they were going to use was not a Low Ash C1 Oil. I now buy the engine oil and fuel and oil filters and get my local garage to do the service.
    09 X Type 2-2 Auto Sovereign Ionian Blue, Ivory/Oyster

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