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Thread: Flat Battery

  1. #21
    Senior Member MarkyM's Avatar
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    It's worked for me for the last 3 cars I've had with a tracker fitted James and has never led me astray
    2014 XK Dynamic R Coupe (no backbox, supercharger pulley upgrade and K&N's)
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  2. #22
    Senior Member jima's Avatar
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    If you are talking about the CTEK I'm a big fan. Perhaps you have the 25 amp version like mine - they can bring a battery up quite quickly. Of course, in times like this any model CTEK is invaluable, Sparky is wired permanently for the 4 amp version I have to keep her tickled up.
    James

    2015 XK Dynamic R Stratus Grey - Sparky

  3. #23
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    Some good helpful comments there, thank you all.

    Battery warranty: good point - I hadn't thought of that. If it is the battery, then obvs. should be replaced FOC without quibble. Straightforward. But if it is not the battery, and the battery was damaged by being drained so completely by the car's electrics, it hadn't occurred to me that I may still be able to get it replaced FOC under warranty. I needn't discuss my car's electrics with the battery supplier!

    However, before I fit a new battery and possibly bugger that one as well, I'd like to ascertain whether the car discharging it somehow, rather than it being purely a battery fault.

    So:

    Clamp-on current meter:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0753FY7...395841_TE_dp_1

    Arrived very promptly last week. £41 - neat little thing, quite small, clamp only just fits round car's battery lead but that's possibly why reviewers find it gives slightly more stable DC current readings than other ones. There are cheaper ones from around £25 - all with larger clamps - but many are either out-of stock or on very slow delivery from China, and (perhaps because of the larger clamps) all get poorer reports for consistency of current readings.

    But this thread is probably not the place to discuss clamp meters in detail. If anyone is interested, shout up and I'll start a dedicated thread.

    Current readings: Tried it initially on my Skoda Ocatvia - a known situation, regularly used vehicle, reliable (and also just had a new battery fitted). battery drain = 0.3A ign off; 4.5A ign on; 16.8A headlights on main beam. I presume these are fairly normal readings.

    Then tried it on the Jaguar. Apparently 1.4A discharge with ign. off - but then I realised that I had to have the car unlocked and the boot lid open (and thus the boot interior light on) to be able to access the battery leads. Not like the Skoda where I could have the bonnet up with the car locked and everything switched off. And the Jaguar probably needed to go through its shut-down process, which it presumably wan't going to start doing while the boot remained open.

    Just out of interest, I also checked the current in the CTEK 12V battery lead (luckily I also use a CTEK 12v extention cable where the conductors separate at one point) while it started re-charging charging the battery. CTEK output current = 4.6A which I reckon is OK for a supposed 5A charger.

    Cunning plan: So - how to check current draw in the Jaguar with everything switched off, closed, locked and supposedly fully shut down? A possible cunning plan: disconnect a battery lead, and re-connect it to the battery post but using a jump lead, which I can loop outside the car so that I can read the current with my clamp meter without opening or unlocking anything. A cheap-and-nasty, fairly thin jump lead should fit through the boot lid seal OK - after all, I'm not going to pass any massive starter-motor-type currents through it.

    Safety would suggest doing this with the earth (-ve) lead so that it doesn't matter if any part of the any of the leads should accidentally come into contact with the car's body shell.

    But: another cunning plan. If I interpose the jump lead in the live (+ve) battery connection instead (obvs. same current goes through either battery lead - worry if it doesn't!), and if I use a pair of jump leads connected end-to-end and looped through the boot lid seal to the outside, I can access the conductor where the two clamps are connected mid-way and then, even if I'm outside the closed-and-locked car, I can measure the battery's terminal voltage at any time (i.e., the voltage of the jump lead connectors, which would remain connected together, relative to the car's bodywork) as well as the drain current.

    And if I also take my CTEK out of the boot (where I normally have it if I'm charging the battery) and let its 12V battery connector lead run through the boot seal, I can then also disconnect it / re-connect it to the battery any time I want to, without unlocking and opening the car. Obviously, while I'm actually checking battery drain, once the battery is fully charged to begin with, I would leave the CTEK disconnected.

    Al this would be temporary of course. I wouldn't want to leave a clipped-together pair of battery leads which were connected directly to the car's +ve 12V terminal dangling around outside the car for very long or without keeping a careful eye on it.

    Can anyone see a problem with my cunning plan? (If there is a big flash and a loud bang at any time, or my car bursts into flames, or if you never hear from me again, you will know that perhaps there was a slight problem.)
    Jaguar 2007 4.2 litre XK (X150) convertible
    Maxzda 2007 MX-5 2.0 litre (non - 'Sport') roadster-coupe
    Skoda 2007 Octavia 2.0TDI 4WD (not a Scout) estate
    Reliant 1975 Scimitar GTE SE5a (off the road after 243,000 from new)

  4. #24
    Senior Member Jimbov8's Avatar
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    All you need to do is operate the boot lock whilst it is open with the shaft of a screwdriver, basically mimicking the action of shutting the boot lid.

    You will see the lights go off and you should be able to lock the car with the boot lid still open. You can then carry out any test you want to.

    Warning....do not accidentally close the boot lid until you have unlocked the car.
    Jim.
    2012 XKR Black pack, Speed Pack, Aero pack, Rat pack. Past:-87'XJS 3.6L, 93'XJ40 3.2L gold, 95'XJ6 4.0L sport, 00'XJ8 3.2L sport, 2005 XK8 4.2L coupe, 2009 XK 5.0L Portfolio in that order and enjoyed all of 'em.

    I do not offer advice, I only say what I would do with the set of circumstances presented. Your choice always.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbov8 View Post
    All you need to do is operate the boot lock whilst it is open with the shaft of a screwdriver, basically mimicking the action of shutting the boot lid.

    You will see the lights go off and you should be able to lock the car with the boot lid still open. You can then carry out any test you want to.
    This is the way to go.
    Also there's a very good recent thread in the s type forum about chasing battery draw. Other owners of similar cars can confirm the exact numbers you should have but expect a minimal draw, "Anything above 30-100mA after 45-60 minutes is a drain".
    https://www.jaguarforum.com/showthre...19#post1253219
    2007 S type R, Radiance Red/ Champagne, all options but for the sunroof. Oh, and the garage door opener.
    Added MP3 audio connectivity module.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbov8 View Post
    All you need to do is operate the boot lock whilst it is open with the shaft of a screwdriver, basically mimicking the action of shutting the boot lid.

    You will see the lights go off and you should be able to lock the car with the boot lid still open. You can then carry out any test you want to.

    Warning....do not accidentally close the boot lid until you have unlocked the car.
    Thanks - good idea - simple. BUT if I want access to the fuse boxes I would need do the same with both doors as well (dunno about the bonnet?) AND leave 'em all open - not very convenient.

    This video



    covers the some of the same ground and also has other interesting stuff, including showing a clamp meter in use. (And I like the idea of a test meter with a max / min recording feature - I want one. I love toys, me)

    I had never heard of the 'fuse voltage drop' technique, but he doesn't think much of it anyway. But I do like his optical pyrometer, at 18 mins 30 sec into the video. I'd like one of those, too, but they probably cost £mega.

    Edited to add - imaging pyrometer £130:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Roeam-Infra...178557&sr=8-13

    or for £19 if you can manage without the imaging and are willing to use just use a laser-guided 'point-and-shoot' pyrometer:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Schneider-E...5RZQYN0P9RMYRA
    Last edited by Titus; 22-05-20 at 20:51.
    Jaguar 2007 4.2 litre XK (X150) convertible
    Maxzda 2007 MX-5 2.0 litre (non - 'Sport') roadster-coupe
    Skoda 2007 Octavia 2.0TDI 4WD (not a Scout) estate
    Reliant 1975 Scimitar GTE SE5a (off the road after 243,000 from new)

  7. #27
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    I don't think you can leave the doors open due to the alarm. I'd just wait.
    The guy who posted in the thread I linked did say waiting between fuse tests was the worse bit.
    2007 S type R, Radiance Red/ Champagne, all options but for the sunroof. Oh, and the garage door opener.
    Added MP3 audio connectivity module.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrKis View Post
    I don't think you can leave the doors open due to the alarm. I'd just wait.
    The guy who posted in the thread I linked did say waiting between fuse tests was the worse bit.
    If you can fool the latch on the boot lid, surely you can do exactly the same with the door locks - just as the chap in the video showed. You'd need to anyway (as he did) to get access to the internal fuse box(es).

    The two waits he seemed to be (quite understandably) complaining about were (1) initially waiting about an hour - just the once - for the whole vehicle to shut down initially, and then (2) the pauses (a few minutes or seconds) between the times when the faulty, current-drawing item cycled on and off; here, it was the rear wiper motor, and in this video he had the advantage that he already knew where the fault was.
    Jaguar 2007 4.2 litre XK (X150) convertible
    Maxzda 2007 MX-5 2.0 litre (non - 'Sport') roadster-coupe
    Skoda 2007 Octavia 2.0TDI 4WD (not a Scout) estate
    Reliant 1975 Scimitar GTE SE5a (off the road after 243,000 from new)

  9. #29
    Senior Member Jimbov8's Avatar
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    You should only need to fool one door and it is the same way as the boot lock.
    Jim.
    2012 XKR Black pack, Speed Pack, Aero pack, Rat pack. Past:-87'XJS 3.6L, 93'XJ40 3.2L gold, 95'XJ6 4.0L sport, 00'XJ8 3.2L sport, 2005 XK8 4.2L coupe, 2009 XK 5.0L Portfolio in that order and enjoyed all of 'em.

    I do not offer advice, I only say what I would do with the set of circumstances presented. Your choice always.

  10. #30
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    I had a problem with the battery going to flat after about 4 days of none use, fitted new battery still got the same problem.
    One day I went to the car and pulled the driver’s door handle the door opened and the alarm went off I then realised I had left the keys in the house, so it turned out that all thought the car was locking and the little red light was flashing inside the car the drivers door was not locking and the car was never shutting down properly,replaced a faulty door release cable bingo problem sorted
    XJL 351 2010
    Last edited by Minstrel; 22-05-20 at 22:57. Reason: Add car model
    XJL

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