Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 45

Thread: How to replace a Transfer Box

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    192
    Post Thanks / Like

    How to replace a Transfer Box

    I thought I'd have a go at replacing my knackered Transfer box. All the manuals say you need to drop the front subframe to do it properly - this wasn't an option with the tools I've got so I thought I would try to do it the hard way.

    Make sure the selector is in neutral and the handbrake is off. Jack car up and support on axle stands - the front stands can go under the subframe - the rears can go under the body in front of the rear wheels - I put mine under a long section of steel channel packed off the cill with timber just to spread the load further. I also had a liberal spread of spare axle stands, wheels and trolley jacks strewn around under the car as a backup should the worst happen.
    First job was to drop the propshaft out of the way. Release the six allen headed (6mm) bolts, pull the propshaft rearwards to clear the ****** and it should drop down. You'll need to rotate the propshaft to get at all the bolts which is why the box needs to be in neutral. It's quite heavy so take care.


    First pig job - exhaust removal. I couldn’t get at the pinch bolt attaching the downpipe to the RH catalytic converter so I had to use the angle grinder through the offside wheel arch. There was just enough room to cut through the clamp (but not the pipe). This required removal of the lower plastic wheel arch liner - a few torx screws hold it in place. I also removed the brake caliper and disc to get them out of the way.


    The pinch bolt to the LH catalytic converter was straightforward as were the two bolts to the rear section ****** and the two bolts holding the LH downpipe to the RH downpipe. A bit of brute force and the two downpipe sections can be maneuvered out.
    Next job is to remove the bottom engine steady bar - two 15mm bolts and it drops out easily. I also removed the RH TB support bracket - two 10mm bolts to the RH side of the TB and a 13mm bolt into the sump and it came away easily.


    It should look a little like this underneath now:


    Pig job no.2 - the bracket that supports the steady bar also wraps over the TB as a heat shield. This needs to be removed. The two 13mm nuts on the TB output casing are easy as is the 10mm bolt on the end of the TB. However, there are two 13mm bolts sandwiched between the top of the heatshield and the catalytic converter. I couldn't make up any combination of sockets and extensions to get at them. The only option I had was to release the cat at the exhaust manifold to allow more room. This would require removal of the inlet manifold to get access. I was intending to change the spark plugs whilst the car was in bits so this wasn't abortive work.
    I've got LPG fitted so there are lots of extra bits to remove that I won't go into here. Everything is accessible and reasonably obvious so follow your nose and JTIS to remove the manifold.
    I also drained all the fluids at this point:
    a) Water through the drain below the radiator (had to remove the front undertray to gain access)
    b) Automatic transmission fluid using the easily accessible drain plug on the underside of the box – 3 litres drained out so presumably there is 5 litres left in there somewhere.
    c) Transfer Box - I didn't bother with this as I suspected that there wasn't any oil in it and there is no drain plug to speak of (I would have removed the output gear casing to drain the TB fully if I thought it was necessary).
    Once the manifold is clear it reveals a small tin heatshield over the exhaust manifold - two 10mm nuts and it can be removed. You should now see something like this:


    The three 13mm nuts holding the RH cat to the manifold can be accessed by prising the flexible heatshield away from the ****** and using a suitable extension bar (one of my studs sheared but this isn't the end of the world. Once the TB is off the cat can be removed. I could then remove the sheared stud and replace it)
    Back under the car, with the cat released this gave me enough clearance to crack the 13mm bolts holding the transfer box shield to the engine block. I then used a magic flexible drive to fully remove the nuts.
    The shield can now be pulled clear (it may need a bit of persuasion as it is still squeezed between the TB and the RH end support bracket)
    This is the offending article:


    Next pig job was the RH end support bracket - this supports the end of the TB off the engine block and is secured by four 13mm bolts. I could get at three of them quite easily and remove them. The fourth (top left) was not for moving. In the end I had to sacrifice a 13mm ring spanner by cutting it down to a short enough length to allow me to fit it onto the bolt head - I could then crack the bolt by using an extension bar on the end of the spanner from below. The bolt doesn't need to be removed since the bracket is a forked fit. The bracket could then be removed past the transfer box.


    My poor spanner:


    Final job is removal of the linkshaft & driveshaft. The book says remove most of the front right hand side of the car but a tip on another post showed me the secret of simply removing the front lower arm bolt.


    Remove the clip securing the rubber boot to the linkshaft/driveshaft gaiter and it is now possible to remove the driveshaft from the linkshaft by pulling the hub assembly outwards. I wrapped everything in clingfilm to keep the dust out.


    The linkshaft now has to be freed from the TB and gearbox - purists look away now but this was my technique for releasing the shaft (a tap with a hammer on the mole-grips did the trick)


    The books say don't let the shaft come out more than 150mm so I didn't (I never got to the bottom of where the internal TB seal is but intend to strip down the old box to find out)
    The transfer box can now be removed - simply remove the four 15mm bolts holding the TB to the gearbox. A bit more pushing and twisting and the box is free to be removed. You may find some remnants of old oil leak out now so have drip tray ready. It's quite heavy so either get some help or, as I did gently lower it onto your chest and wriggle out from beneath the car. Luckily no photo's of this operation.
    And here it is:


    I've already removed the output gear casing in my eagerness to see how bad things were.
    There was no oil in the box , just a black gungy mess - no wonder the poor box said enough is enough.


    The linkshaft seal was completely fubarred


    It should look more like this:


    The old v new filler/drain plugs also tell a story:


    I was replacing my later mechanical TB with an earlier Viscous coupling type box. The cases looked to be near identical and appeared to be a straight swap.
    Early VC right v later mechanical left TB's (output gear casing removed from later box):


    I had to re-use my old link shaft since the replacement box didn't have one. I've got small concerns about the elusive TB inner seal but I very delicately swapped the linkshaft over - it seems fine but time will tell.
    I took the opportunity to modify the box to allow draining/refilling - thanks to astromorg for his previous post. My permutation was like this:
    Drain plug as astromorg:


    Filler tube courtesy of B&Q:


    Installation is the opposite of removal – as they say.

    Ex 2005 X-Type Estate 2.5 AWD LPG
    Maserati 3200GT - Daily Driver
    1977 1500 Midget - de-bumpered and glass fronted.
    Ford Fiesta Mk2 1985 - 2.1 Turbo - Trackday special

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cats_paws's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Dorchester, Dorset
    Posts
    387
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to replace a Transfer Box

    That was interesting thank you.

    This picture was a bit alarming. I must try to drain and refill my box.

    2013 XF 3.0D Premium Luxury stop/start Caviar red metallic

  3. #3
    westville
    Guest

    Re: How to replace a Transfer Box

    Another REALLY usefdul post with great pics - well done

    Keep em coming fellas - we will soon have a complete set of how to guides for these cars

    Jim

  4. #4
    Senior Member astromorg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Portsmouth/Southampton
    Posts
    2,250
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to replace a Transfer Box

    Great Guide - valuable and terrifying at the same time!!

    Your photos raised one new concern for me - the Filling Point seems to be just a duplicate of the OEM magnetic drain plug. I was under the impression - and have advised others! - that it doubled as a vent point. It can't do that if it is just a plug, so can you re-assure us all that there is a vent point somewhere in the normally inaccessible reaches you've exposed?

    Looking forward to a post covering a strip down and re-build.
    2005 XK8 4.2-S Coupe and 2006 Auto Sovereign 3.0 X Type Saloon

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    88
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to replace a Transfer Box

    Great post, well done. Hope this helps other DIYers put there.
    Regards,
    2001 X-type 3.0SE

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Ian D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Hampshire
    Posts
    8,769
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to replace a Transfer Box

    The vent is on the top of the transfer box, to the right of it. Is a thimble shape, works on a ball system, basically the ball lifts and oil comes out if the pressure is too great inside, spraying the subframe and engine and whatever else in doing so!

    Just one point i have, In the JTIS it specifies cable tie-ing the propshaft out the way instead of just leaving it on the floor putting a lot of excess pressure on the centre bearing, just my 2 pence thats all.
    Current Car:
    2016 XF 3.0d S, 17MY - 35k miles, Ultimate Black and loads of extras.

    Previous Cars:
    2000 S-Type 3.0L SE Auto
    2004 X-Type 3.0L AWD SE Auto estate.
    2007 XK x150 4.2L Coupe
    2017 XE R-Sport 25t 250Ps 18MY

    Resident Super Moderator.
    My 2016 x260 XF 3.0d S ownership thread

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    192
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: How to replace a Transfer Box

    JTIS it specifies cable tie-ing the propshaft out the way instead of just leaving it on the floo
    That was a concern but once it's released it has plenty of play to allow it to drop a fair bit. If I was using a vehicle hoist then tying it up would be necessary but just dropping it a foot or so didn't seem to put any strain on the joint - there was no resistance. If in doubt then yes tie it up out of the way. There have been no noiticable effects on my propshaft so far though.
    Ex 2005 X-Type Estate 2.5 AWD LPG
    Maserati 3200GT - Daily Driver
    1977 1500 Midget - de-bumpered and glass fronted.
    Ford Fiesta Mk2 1985 - 2.1 Turbo - Trackday special

  8. #8
    Member Jesse Lackman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    North Dakota USA
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like
    Why can't the rear output shaft bearing housing be removed to drain the oil for an oil change?

    Like it has in this picture; http://i965.photobucket.com/albums/a..._w600_h450.jpg

    It looks like it can be removed while the transfer case is still in the car, and it looks that all the transfer case oil would drain out of the opening.

    Drain, clean, re-install with a bead of Ultra Black RTV or "The Right Stuff" and fill the transfer case.
    Last edited by Jesse Lackman; 02-06-12 at 09:07.

  9. #9
    Senior Member astromorg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Portsmouth/Southampton
    Posts
    2,250
    Post Thanks / Like
    Seems so easy!! But if you look at the output bearing housing in situ in the car you'll see that it can't be removed until the transfer box shield (referred to as 'the offending article' for its photo in dunnah01's post) has been removed - a major task in itself!

  10. #10
    Member Jesse Lackman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    North Dakota USA
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like
    I see that now, I was gonig to say it makes sense but it doesn't make sense! Somewhere another sadistic engineer is laughing every time he thinks about some poor mechanic trying to remove the output housing.

    That shield looks like two seperate pieces spot welded together. How about drilling out the spot welds, leave the top piece in place, then bolting them back together when you reassemble?

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •