Page 1 of 12 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 118

Thread: Turbo Actuator Repair

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Middlesex
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Turbo Actuator Repair

    My 2005 2.0D is suffering the dreaded MIL (coil light) flashing and lapsing into limp home mode pretty well every journey now. I have error code P2263.

    The Turbo Actuator appears to have been opened and re-sealed at some time in the past by a previous owner, presumably to repair, and has pinkish "warranty protection" "void if removed" security seals over the spring closure clips.
    Does anyone recognise the stickers (see photo)



    I have already contacted ECU Testing Ltd. and they advise the stickers are not theirs.

    If I can find out who did the original repair, I figure that if the repair came with a "Lifetime Warranty" that the same company ought to do a (free) repair again? I just need to find out who did it.

    I have already cleaned the EGR valve and MAF sensor as described elsewhere in this forum, and this has not solved the problem.

    When the MIL (coil light) comes on the actuator arm on the Turbo Controller slumps to it's de-activated state and does not move. I assume that once the limp home mode is triggered, that the ECU prevents the Turbo from being activated, so even if an intermittent fault cleared itself, the turbo would not be activated for the rest of the journey/until the ignition is re-cycled (switched off & on again)?

  2. Thanks jagjunkie thanked for this post
    Likes andy pen liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    3,455
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair


  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    287
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    I haven't had this issue but it's interesting to note the fix and I've bookmarked just in case. Where abouts is this though and how do you remove the actuator? Is it directly on top of the turbo towards the back of the engine near the bulkhead?

    Thanks!
    2006 Jaguar X-Type 2.0D Sport Estate

  5. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Middlesex
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    The Turbo Actuator looks simple to remove (& hence replace), but I think I've heard/read somewhere that its re-alignment is critical, but I find that hard to believe since it appears to be a simple bolt-off, bolt-on exercise.
    Any opinions/advice?

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    High Wycombe, Bucks
    Posts
    172
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    I had this issue with my Jaguar X type.

    The main dealer stated that the turbo actuator CANNOT be replaced without a whole new turbo and therefore billed the warranty company £1420 for a whole new turbo.

    However, I made contact with a couple of very reputable indepedant specialists in my area who said that was total rubbish and it CAN be replaced on it's own, They quoted £400 all in for the work which they said will take about 6 -7 days.

    Either way, make sure you source the right onfo first before shelling out on parts
    2006 (56) 2.2d X-Type Sport Premium Estate - Glacier Blue - Private Plate - Jaguar Bodykit - Cream Leather - SMILES per gallon!!

  7. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Middlesex
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    Having read the post by scy73
    http://www.talkford.com/topic/162803...d-p2263-error/
    Unless I get any posts warning of re-fitting/re-alignment problems, then if I get some time this weekend I'll remove the Turbo Actuator, remove its cover and inspect the connections as reported by scy73.
    Since no-one appears to know whose warranty stickers I will be destroying when I open the unit up, I can't be loosing out on a warranty if I don't know/can't find out whose warranty it is

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    WARNING: Contents may contain total cobblers
    Posts
    972
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    I can't advise you on re-alignment issues but if you do need to scrape the pad to solder it be very careful not to chip or crack the PCB, from the big pics it looks to be a ceramic board.

    I don't know for sure as I've not had the pleasure of opening mine yet!


    Si.
    07 S-Type 2.7D SE with many toys, if it offered to massage my testicles while driving it wouldn't surprise me !
    This ones got a lightey up ashtray already Andy !!

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    322
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    I would Go ahead and attempt the repair but, in my expensive experience, the actuators fails cos ot over heats. It over heats cos it is working against a seizing turbo vane, the vane can be cleaned but will never be restored 100%. The actuators are not available new on their own. Ecu testing are imo cowboys, took 250 quodc off me and didn't open the unit. I ended up with a new turbo with a new actuator...... job done.

  10. Thanks lew1kat thanked for this post
    Likes lew1kat liked this post
  11. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Middlesex
    Posts
    18
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    Recap - My 2005 2.0D is suffering the dreaded MIL (coil light) flashing and lapsing into limp home mode pretty well every journey now. I have error code P2263.


    Yesterday I bit the bullet and tackled the investigation and repair of the Turbo Actuator/Control Unit.
    The Turbo Actuator appears to have been opened and re-sealed at some time in the past by a previous owner, presumably to repair, and has pinkish "warranty protection" "void if removed" security seals over the spring closure clips (see photo).



    I had attempted to try to find out which company had performed the earlier repair by trying to identify them through the anti-tamper stickers – unfortunately to no avail.

    Following removal of the Turbo Actuator/Control Unit from the car, after removal of the spring clips the metal body and black plastic casing were easily separated from one another. Inspection of the ceramic circuit board in the black plastic part of the casing immediately revealed the problem(s).

    There are connection pads around the periphery of the ceramic circuit board that are connected by small wires to connection pads on the black plastic housing that have been spot welded to their respective pads.

    These spot welded connections are prone to fatigue and break, usually at the point of the spot weld.

    To repair the connection one might imagine that a new wire could be soldered in place, however the metallic plating on the connection pads cannot be soldered with standard tin/lead solder. Thankfully the connection pad appears to be copper underneath the top surface, copper of course can be soldered. So it is necessary to abrade the top surface of the metal pad away until copper is exposed which will take solder.

    Now back to the problems exhibited on my circuit board.
    It can be seen from the attached photos that the previous repair was an incredibly poor attempt at soldering and very hand-fisted. The solder joint was a “dry” joint, the solder had not flowed properly onto the wire. You can see that the solder is “dull” instead of shiny in appearance. Also it is clear that whoever had done the soldering was not very dexterous, much of the surrounding area has been burnt/melted with the soldering iron.
    I have circled the problem area in the following 3 photos:-





    This is a photo of the original repair - how not to do it - presumably someone had to pay good money to an outfit for this, shocking!




    The dry solder joint would explain the intermittent problem of the MIL (coil light) and limp-home mode, which gradually became more and more frequent as the connection degraded, eventually becoming an open circuit. In addition to the dry joint, the connection immediately to the right of this was on the verge of breaking – I checked the strength/integrity of all the wire links and the one next the dry joint became detached with the very gentlest of pressure, so I removed and replaced both. The following image shows the pads having been cleaned up and abbraided to expose a solder-able surface. Be careful when rubbing down the pads on the ceramic circuit board, don't be brutal, the ceramic is brittle and can crack if mistreated. Also be careful about the swarf you produce when rubbing the pads down, make sure ALL swarf is removed.




    The next image shows the new wire connections that I soldered on, I used a small gauge wire and formed it up into a loop to avoid having a short wire that would have very little compliance under vibration/thermal expansion/contraction.



    Re-assembly of the two halves of the Turbo Actuator is just a case of putting the two halves back together again and putting the 6 spring clips back.

    For those of you who are intrigued as to what is in the other half of the Turbo Actuator (the metal part) I have included a couple of photos. Basically it is a motor that drives a worm drive that causes the actuator arm to rotate. There is a cream coloured wheel with a grey pattern on it (reminiscent of a radio-active symbol) that is part of a position sensor, the other part of the position sensor is the pretty Catherine-wheel type pattern on the ceramic circuit board.





    A quick test drive yesterday followed by a 70 mile round trip to work today on the M3 today reveals that my handy-work has fixed the fault that was causing the MIL (coil light) to flash and lapsing into limp-home mode.

    Hope this is of some benifit to others who are having similar trouble.

  12. Thanks rayx thanked for this post
  13. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    WARNING: Contents may contain total cobblers
    Posts
    972
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Turbo Actuator Repair

    Nice update, great pics and explaination, a quality repair and above all you seem to have solved your prob' and possibly a few others too!


    Nice work, let us know how it goes,

    Si.
    07 S-Type 2.7D SE with many toys, if it offered to massage my testicles while driving it wouldn't surprise me !
    This ones got a lightey up ashtray already Andy !!

  14. Thanks doubletee thanked for this post
    Likes doubletee liked this post
Page 1 of 12 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •