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Thread: fuel filler cap won't click shut

  1. #31
    Senior Member Fat Boy Slim's Avatar
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    Fuel filler release all fixed and working, it was so easy to do and a fraction of the cost of a garage.

    5mtrs x1.6mm stainless steel wire cost £4.00.
    1 x 7mm width x 10mm length screw type barrel nipple cost £1.99
    1 x 1.6mm spade crimp cost nothing (bottom of toolbox)

    Remove driver’s side foot protector; remove fuel cut off protector panel. Pull back carpet and prop up with a piece of wood. Un bolt fuel release handle.

    Remove driver’s side rear boot cover, remove inside panel. Pull out the release cable allowing some slack. Inside fuel cap area, turn striker 90deg clockwise and pull out about 1 foot. Remove cover from striker, disassemble and snip inner cable. Pull cable through from drivers side fuel release handle.

    In my case, the cable was totally frayed and stretched through gorilla like action at pumps.

    Crimp on the connector at one end of new wire and snip back so that just a small piece is crimped onto the wire. Reassemble striker and pawl. Thread the other end through from the striker to the release catch. Make sure that the striker is reassembled correctly and re fit. Insert barrel nipple into catch and thread the wire through it making sure you have a good length of spare wire. Refit catch, tighten barrel nipple and test release mechanism. Now snip back the wire with a little slack and refit the carpet etc.

    One repaired fuel release at a cost of under £6. vs £55 plus labour from garage. Time taken about 40 minutes.

    FBS
    1997 Carnival Red X300, 2009 Dirty Blue 2.2 X type estate with dreaded DPF

  2. #32
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Boy Slim View Post
    Fuel filler release all fixed and working, it was so easy to do and a fraction of the cost of a garage.

    5mtrs x1.6mm stainless steel wire cost £4.00.
    1 x 7mm width x 10mm length screw type barrel nipple cost £1.99
    1 x 1.6mm spade crimp cost nothing (bottom of toolbox)

    Remove driver’s side foot protector; remove fuel cut off protector panel. Pull back carpet and prop up with a piece of wood. Un bolt fuel release handle.

    Remove driver’s side rear boot cover, remove inside panel. Pull out the release cable allowing some slack. Inside fuel cap area, turn striker 90deg clockwise and pull out about 1 foot. Remove cover from striker, disassemble and snip inner cable. Pull cable through from drivers side fuel release handle.

    In my case, the cable was totally frayed and stretched through gorilla like action at pumps.

    Crimp on the connector at one end of new wire and snip back so that just a small piece is crimped onto the wire. Reassemble striker and pawl. Thread the other end through from the striker to the release catch. Make sure that the striker is reassembled correctly and re fit. Insert barrel nipple into catch and thread the wire through it making sure you have a good length of spare wire. Refit catch, tighten barrel nipple and test release mechanism. Now snip back the wire with a little slack and refit the carpet etc.

    One repaired fuel release at a cost of under £6. vs £55 plus labour from garage. Time taken about 40 minutes.

    FBS
    Apologies for resurrection of old thread, but I'm following this guide right now. Can anyone suggest to me why the inner cable just isn't moving when trying to remove from the outer casing? There's zero movement when trying to pull it through. Thanks for any advice or tips. I loathe the thought of having to give in and take it in to the garage

  3. #33
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    Oct 2019
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    OK, I did get the old wire out. Had to completely strip the entire wire, including casing and lever out of the car; Put the barrel end in a vice, and heave the bugger out. It was ceased in the outer casing, good and proper. Bit of damage to casing, but lubed it nice and good and inserted the new wire as per the above guide and reassembled the lot back into the car.

    Advice I need...

    The latch piece simply won't stay out. Getting the bugger into place is like winning the lottery. Had to drill a small hole in the tip and used a solid wire with hook to pull it through, but the moment you remove the hook, it wants to ping back inside the hole. I've even tried replacing the spring with a longer and more solid one, but to no avail. What am I missing? The fog has descended and I'm probably missing the obvious here now. Am I over tensioning it or something else?

  4. #34
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2019
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    well for what it's worth, I did it. Seems the new spring was too long, and kept pushing the latch mechanism out of the hole it threads through. Cut new, stronger spring down to size, et voila. I now have absolute knowledge of the entire mechanism, so I guess that's something.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Billy2Jags's Avatar
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    It's the best way to learn
    Current. 2010 XFS Portfolio. Lunar Grey (LJZ) / Black (LEG).
    Previous. 2012 XF Premium Luxury. Remapped 307 BHP / 449 lb/ft. Italian Racing Red (CAH) / Barley
    Previous. 2005 55 reg 06MY 2.0D Sovereign. Jaguar Racing Green - HGZ.
    In storage.1988 Daimler XJ40. Bordeaux Red / Doeskin.

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