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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I’ve been looking for a 50k mile service schedule to see what’s included but can’t seem to find any specific details, anyone able to provide a link please?

My nearest independent is 1hr+ away and I’m guessing a main dealer would be £😳, car has FDSH from when I had it as a company car so I’m keen to maintain a SH but not sure whether to go for a generic service somewhere local.
 

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Petrol or diesel? If the latter, buy a pump and do your own oil changes in between the normal schedule. 8k miles is plenty for oil and the diesel has some weaknesses that fresher oil may mitigate.
Not exactly what you asked, I know but worth a mention. 2019+ Diesel engines are more robust.
Most dealers will discount for older cars and you can haggle with them to a degree. I have asked for a discount many times and always got something. Some dealers are more willing than others. They know many people leave the dealer network when the car is older.

There may be some items that are not on the official schedule, like gearbox oil changes, which are recommended by members.
Which engine and what year?
 

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In general...

If you go to a normal garage and ask for "a service", you will get a oil and filter change.

If you go to a good Indy specialist, they should be able to tell you up front what they will do for the money. Whether or not they actually do what they say depends how good they are, or how much you hammer them down on price.

If you go to a dealer, whether paying new car service costs or older car service costs, you will probably get an oil change, maybe even an oil filter change, and unlikely get what they claim to do. Unless you are lucky enough to get a good technician who doesn't need the money, and only comes to work for something to do.


As for selling it on, FSH can be a bargaining tool. It probably won't increase it's value (not withstanding the stupid 20k servicing and the associated chain problems that gives), but makes yours easier to sell. FSH in this case just means a receipt for a service (from anywhere, dealer, indy, backstreet garage, or even your own receipts for the bits if you DIY), which could be as little as an oil change. Personally, I would treat a car serviced at a dealer at the specified service interval as not having any history.


As to the specifics of what is on the schedule, that can vary with age. But as said, any good independent or dealer should be able to tell you what they will (claim to) do for that. Or post or private message your VIN (or Reg if its never been private plated) and someone can look it up on TOPix
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Petrol or diesel? If the latter, buy a pump and do your own oil changes in between the normal schedule. 8k miles is plenty for oil and the diesel has some weaknesses that fresher oil may mitigate.
Not exactly what you asked, I know but worth a mention. 2019+ Diesel engines are more robust.
Most dealers will discount for older cars and you can haggle with them to a degree. I have asked for a discount many times and always got something. Some dealers are more willing than others. They know many people leave the dealer network when the car is older.

There may be some items that are not on the official schedule, like gearbox oil changes, which are recommended by members.
Which engine and what year?
Hi, thanks for the replies and apologies for the lack of relevant information🤦‍♂️. It’s a 2016 2.0D R Sport. I keep reading about the potential engine issues and I’m scared about that tbh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just phoned the main dealer out of interest, £220 and all they’ll do is oil/filter and whatever visual checks they do. Indy is £205 for the same service. Assume only a main dealer or Indy would be able to update the online service log?
 

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I have mine serviced every year by a garage i've used for year's and I supply what's needed ( engine oil, oil filter, air filter, cabin filter ).
I know that there's been plenty off comments about this engine , but my experience in almost 3 years is that it's a great engine and have had no problems, and if and when any different noises appear it will be seen too Asap.
I've looked at the V6 3 litre engine, but with it having 2 turbos and 2 egr valves and numerous plastic parts I think that I'll give it a miss.
 

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Hi, thanks for the replies and apologies for the lack of relevant information🤦‍♂️. It’s a 2016 2.0D R Sport. I keep reading about the potential engine issues and I’m scared about that tbh.
I wouldn’t be too worried. Listen to the engine idle on a regular basis. Learn what is normal for it and if you do spot any top end rattle, get it seen to by a specialist.
Evan a failure should be repairable without too much drama.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wouldn’t be too worried. Listen to the engine idle on a regular basis. Learn what is normal for it and if you do spot any top end rattle, get it seen to by a specialist.
Evan a failure should be repairable without too much drama.
Is there anything in particular to listen out for, mines had a fairly distinctive diesel rattle since it was a couple of years old (don’t recall it so much when it was new but maybe I just became more aware when the horror stories started).
 

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I’m not an expert in this so hopefully someone will chime in.
The chain is at the rear of the engine and I’d expect a metallic rattle that increases with engine speed coming from that area.
Frequent oil changes are your only defence <8k miles. You can do them yourself all from the engine bay with a pump in under an hour.
 

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Just phoned the main dealer out of interest, £220 and all they’ll do is oil/filter and whatever visual checks they do. Indy is £205 for the same service. Assume only a main dealer or Indy would be able to update the online service log?
I'm staggered an Indy is charging so much for an oil change. Shop around.

I DIY it, and reckon an oil change on the XE is about £30-35, plus 30 mins of my time, using a pump. Probably about an hour if I use sump plug, but thats because without a ramp, it takes me time on keep jacking the car. Most Indys should be in the £60-80ph
 
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I have mine serviced every year by a garage i've used for year's and I supply what's needed ( engine oil, oil filter, air filter, cabin filter ).
I know that there's been plenty off comments about this engine , but my experience in almost 3 years is that it's a great engine and have had no problems, and if and when any different noises appear it will be seen too Asap.
I've looked at the V6 3 litre engine, but with it having 2 turbos and 2 egr valves and numerous plastic parts I think that I'll give it a miss.
I have the older V6 soot chucker in my 2010 XJ, and that engine certainly has its fair share of silly niggles. Granted its massively more powerful, smoother and effortless. But its also less economical, and a pig to work on.
 
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I’m not an expert in this so hopefully someone will chime in.
The chain is at the rear of the engine and I’d expect a metallic rattle that increases with engine speed coming from that area.
Frequent oil changes are your only defence <8k miles. You can do them yourself all from the engine bay with a pump in under an hour.
Personally, on any chain driven diesel engine, I'd be looking more at 3-4k max, and on a belt driven diesel engine, 6-7k max. I intend to do the XE at around the 2-3k mark, and my x351 V6 soot chucker gets down around 4-5k.

Petrols can be extended out further, but diesels get diesel particulates in the oil, which reduces lubrication faster....

....and as you rightly imply, on chains, we want perfect lubrication.
 

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Personally, on any chain driven diesel engine, I'd be looking more at 3-4k max, and on a belt driven diesel engine, 6-7k max. I intend to do the XE at around the 2-3k mark, and my x351 V6 soot chucker gets down around 4-5k.

Petrols can be extended out further, but diesels get diesel particulates in the oil, which reduces lubrication faster....

....and as you rightly imply, on chains, we want perfect lubrication.
I hear this a lot, especially from the US where they 'quick lube' industry thrives, conning a population, but, fact is, these things haven't been true since the 1970s.

It's horses for courses obviously but if you think that whilst manufacturers of course want to spread their service schedules as far apart as possible, that's no use if the result is a short engine life. So they're not setting schedules so far apart as to do damage. That would make no sense either.

I can only go on personal experience. My XF has had annual changes. The mileage as depended on where the office I am working in is located that year but commonly 8-12,000. She's at 104k now, and purring sweetly. My previous car, an E70CDI Merc, was a better example though. That was much more of a motorway car and had oil changes at between 16,000 and 18,000 intervals (8-12 months) for the 10 years I had it. That was Merc's recommendation and that's what I did. It's also the same recommendation for the same engine when installed in sprinters, and they do 750,000 miles without seeing a spanner. MOst owners I came into contact with, did the same without any ill effects.
I sold it with 180,000 miles and everything running sweetly, including the original turbo. Looking through the oil filler, everything was still clean and shiny with no gunk. Last I heard, she was up to 250,000 miles and still going strong. Of course what goes without saying is that you use the best, correct spec, oil you can and a proper top quality filter, but the manufacturers spec isn't that far out.

So, I feel 3k oil changes are overkill to the point of being silly. Of course if it's a low mileage car then other factors enter the frame, hence why the oil I pulled out of my XF a few weeks back was only 2,000 miles old. But for normal 1-2k per month type mileage, with longer runs involved, leaving 12-15,000 miles between changes will do no measurable harm.

In fact, some Merc owners back in the day, skeptical of the numbers, sent their 16,000 mile old oil off for analysis. All came back with 'it's fine for many thousands of miles yet'. Truth is, decent quality oil doesn't break down and good quality filters do an excellent job of cleaning most of the dirt. What's left doesn't generally affect the lubrication abilities.
So, if in doubt, instead of changing the oil, spend half as much on an oil quality lab check. If they say anything other than the oil is fine for another 10,000 miles, let us know. I suspect they won't and you're throwing away good healthy oil for no benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm staggered an Indy is charging so much for an oil change. Shop around.

I DIY it, and reckon an oil change on the XE is about £30-35, plus 30 mins of my time, using a pump. Probably about an hour if I use sump plug, but thats because without a ramp, it takes me time on keep jacking the car. Most Indys should be in the £60-80ph
DIY is sounding like the better option, which oil have you been using, assume not all 0W30 are the same spec? (this Castro Edge Pro looks to be in limited outlets and seems to come in 4L tubs🤷‍♂️). Which pump do u use?
 

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Just to add my two pen'orth.

Jaguar specify a service every 21k or two years. So according to Jaguar, there is no such thing as a 50k service. If you have a 2016 car you are probably looking for a 63k (or 6 year service which any Jag dealer would be quite happy to relieve you of a sizeable sum to do. Any reputable independent can do this service for you, all the service schedule items are available to him on one a number of programs (personally, I use Autodata), and he'll be happy to carry it out at a considerable saving to your pocket.

Now getting back to the Jaguar sevice interval. This may be fine for everything that is done outside of the oil and filter change but, quite frankly, ridiculous other wise. By all means stick to a service every 2 years (21k) but do change the oil and filter annually (say every 10k).

On the diesel Ingenium engine, this should prevent any unexpected disasters re timing gear, but I'll leave you to decide on what is unexpected!

3k oil changes are unnesecary unless, of course, you're only doing 3k every couple of years!

The only sure way is probably a precautionary timing gear change to the post Nov 2019 spec which includes, amongst other improvements, a damped intermediate gear.

Now the disclaimer! To quote Baz Luhrmann, my advice has no basis more reliable than my own meandering experience!

Have a great rest of the day everyone!

P.S. Go find Baz Luhrmann's 'Sunscreen' and give it a good listening to! ;)
 
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3K miles oil changes and 18K mile oil changes are the extremes in both directions. As with most these things, the answer lies somewhere in the middle. Given that engine oil is not some precious finite commodity, I don't see the point in trying to make it last as long as possible.

Let's not forget that some people are changing the oil at low figures to mitigate the dangers of dilution from failed DPF regens.
It's also worth pointing out that some models are known to be more sensitive to oil quality than others. So I don't think that drawing comparisons is good advice in this case. Just because my gran smoked all her life until she died at 120, doesn't mean I should deduce that smoking doesn't kill.

As for the manufacturer recommendations, well, I think we already know they bend the rules on these things. Sealed for life gearboxes for example.

In my experience, most cars, if you're tuned in to the way they run, you can sense that they run ever so slightly sweeter after an oil change, which should tell you something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OK, I’ve bitten the bullet and ordered an oil extraction pump (Sealey tp9312), oil (Shell Helix Ultra Professional AJ-L Engine Oil - 0W-30) and a Bosch filter, £104 all in (Eurocarparts lists the oil as compatible with the Jag spec) so hopefully we’re all good🤞
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Jaguar specify a service every 21k or two years. So according to Jaguar, there is no such thing as a 50k service. If you have a 2016 car you are probably looking for a 63k (or 6 year service
“Service due in xxxx miles” countdown has been on for the last 1000 miles which takes me to around 50k
 

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(Shell Helix Ultra Professional AJ-L Engine Oil - 0W-30) and a Bosch filter, £104 all in (Eurocarparts lists the oil as compatible with the Jag spec)
STJLR.03.5007 Is the oil spec you need. I wouldn't always trust the Euro car parts system to get it right but in this case it seems that The Helix AJ-L carries this accreditation.
I'm sure there is a guide to doing it on here, maybe in the XF section.

What's your plan for resetting the service indicator?
 

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I hear this a lot, especially from the US where they 'quick lube' industry thrives, conning a population, but, fact is, these things haven't been true since the 1970s.

It's horses for courses obviously but if you think that whilst manufacturers of course want to spread their service schedules as far apart as possible, that's no use if the result is a short engine life. So they're not setting schedules so far apart as to do damage. That would make no sense either.

I can only go on personal experience. My XF has had annual changes. The mileage as depended on where the office I am working in is located that year but commonly 8-12,000. She's at 104k now, and purring sweetly. My previous car, an E70CDI Merc, was a better example though. That was much more of a motorway car and had oil changes at between 16,000 and 18,000 intervals (8-12 months) for the 10 years I had it. That was Merc's recommendation and that's what I did. It's also the same recommendation for the same engine when installed in sprinters, and they do 750,000 miles without seeing a spanner. MOst owners I came into contact with, did the same without any ill effects.
I sold it with 180,000 miles and everything running sweetly, including the original turbo. Looking through the oil filler, everything was still clean and shiny with no gunk. Last I heard, she was up to 250,000 miles and still going strong. Of course what goes without saying is that you use the best, correct spec, oil you can and a proper top quality filter, but the manufacturers spec isn't that far out.

So, I feel 3k oil changes are overkill to the point of being silly. Of course if it's a low mileage car then other factors enter the frame, hence why the oil I pulled out of my XF a few weeks back was only 2,000 miles old. But for normal 1-2k per month type mileage, with longer runs involved, leaving 12-15,000 miles between changes will do no measurable harm.

In fact, some Merc owners back in the day, skeptical of the numbers, sent their 16,000 mile old oil off for analysis. All came back with 'it's fine for many thousands of miles yet'. Truth is, decent quality oil doesn't break down and good quality filters do an excellent job of cleaning most of the dirt. What's left doesn't generally affect the lubrication abilities.
So, if in doubt, instead of changing the oil, spend half as much on an oil quality lab check. If they say anything other than the oil is fine for another 10,000 miles, let us know. I suspect they won't and you're throwing away good healthy oil for no benefit.
Trouble is, no oil manufacturer actually makes an oil that lasts longer than about 7k in turbocharged engines (no matter what the marketing says), and this is further reduced in diesels due to particulate contamination. In extreme cases, you can actually even feel the grittiness of the oil.

Now I know the engine engineers will say a really low figure between oil changes, but they will always get overriden by the marketting team, who need to extend this out to give the (particularly fleet) sales teams a chance. Its gets extended to the max, where its believed that engine failures will be under a threshold (often in the region of 0.5 - 2%) in the first 60 - 100k, depending on the warranty, and the curve of the failure rate.

Knowing that, my own mechanical sympathy, plus the fact its chain driven, means I couldn't leave oil changes for even a quarter of what the service schedule states.

But its a personal choice we can all make, shame its, for many, done with a belief that the stated schedule is the best.
 
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