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Ok my Jaguar XF Premium Luxury has been written off so I’ve been given a “hire car” paid for by the other drivers insurers.

I was given a BMW 530 M Sport which although I found very good to drive but extremely harsh. It was so bad I could feel every bump passing up through my spine. I’ve no complaints about the build quality, in fact I would say a lot of areas it exceeds that of Jaguar.
But why in this day with all the electrical gizmos fitted to our cars have BMW decided to fit electric recline and height to the drivers seat but omit to fit electric front rear adjustment.

Like a few of us no doubt we have partners that are of a different height therefore we are constantly changing seat adjustment to suit whoever is driving. I find even sometimes on a longer drive to adjust this on the move with the XF which would be bordering on dangerous to do on the BMW.

Today the hire company wanted the Beemer back in as it was due to go up for sale so in its place I was given a Volvo V90 estate. At first glance I thought oh yes I like this, from the drivers seat it just looks more modern than the BMW with loads of toys. Looking round it Wow! It’s got privacy glass, powered tailgate, even the rear seats fold down under power but then I sat in to drive away.

I simply cannot believe it that in this modern age, I mean even my 16 year old Rover has this and I mean fully powered electric seats. The Volvo appears to have electrical operation for height but you still have to wrestle with an ancient mechanical bar system to adjust fore and aft and a turn wheel to adjust recline.

On this very item alone it would be enough to put me off purchasing so I am just being too fussy.

BTW the build quality on the Volvo exceeds that of Jaguar. Just look in the boot for example where on both cars here, the floor is actually made up of a firm platform and the trim around it fits snuggly whereas on the Jaguar the boot side trim looks like it came out of any Euro box not a so called quality Jaguar.

I particularly like the way Volvo have added a gas strut to hold the boot floor up when accessing the spare wheel. It’s just a pity they couldn’t stretch the spec enough to “electrify” those seats.
 

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Should it really be an option on a car in the sector though? Surely it should be standard on a car costing 30k plus. My Hyundai i30 (2016) and my colleague's i40 (2015) have fully electric seats, mine is the top "premium" spec mind, but his is just a normal spec. I also get a heated steering wheel, and adaptive xenon head lights.
It drives me mad when expensive premium cars make you pay for basic features. The Mercedes C-Class in the 2000's had a horrible bit of grey trim on the boot lid on base models and non colour coded door handles.
 

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I think these Kias and Hyundais are absolutely wonderful , I heard a report on the Radio the other day about warranties
where they were saying that cars with longer warranties were inevitably the most reliable , both these brands were rated
near the top
 

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Well,at least you have had a couple of extended test drives with no sales pressure!

When all is sorted out,will you return to Jaguar,or has the Volvo turned your head?

:-D
 

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I think these Kias and Hyundais are absolutely wonderful , I heard a report on the Radio the other day about warranties
where they were saying that cars with longer warranties were inevitably the most reliable , both these brands were rated
near the top
A brand such as Kia or Hyundai offer long warranties as a way to stand out against other brands and gain sales, if it was offered with a usual 3 year warranty, would as many people buy them? I strongly doubt it.

Car manufacturers such as BMW offer a low spec with manual seats etc to give out a headline grabbing from only price of the car. If you want a spec that you want, you have to pay for it.
 

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Car manufacturers such as BMW offer a low spec with manual seats etc to give out a headline grabbing from only price of the car. If you want a spec that you want, you have to pay for it.
Often referred to as "poverty spec" god no's why as there still expensive :-D
 

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A brand such as Kia or Hyundai offer long warranties as a way to stand out against other brands and gain sales, if it was offered with a usual 3 year warranty, would as many people buy them? I strongly doubt it.

Car manufacturers such as BMW offer a low spec with manual seats etc to give out a headline grabbing from only price of the car. If you want a spec that you want, you have to pay for it.
I think your talking out your rear end , Kia and Hyundai offer these warranties simply because of the cars reliability , it would be commercial suicide
to do otherwise . In fact Kia came number one for reliability in the JD Power Survey , contrast that with the rubbish dished up by JLR who occupy
the top three places for warranty claims via Warranty Direct . People are buying them because they are well equipped , they are reliable and the
manufacturer is prepared to stand by their Product
 

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I think your talking out your rear end , Kia and Hyundai offer these warranties simply because of the cars reliability , it would be commercial suicide
to do otherwise . In fact Kia came number one for reliability in the JD Power Survey , contrast that with the rubbish dished up by JLR who occupy
the top three places for warranty claims via Warranty Direct . People are buying them because they are well equipped , they are reliable and the
manufacturer is prepared to stand by their Product
Not at all, if you want to establish a brand you offer more than others do, it's just common sense. Offer a long warranty and people know they have nothing to worry about for 7 years. The reliability of them just backs it up, it has taken them over a decade to have decent designs now that people might be tempted by.

Toyota offer 5 years and are widely renowned as one of the most reliable brands you can buy, offer 7 and you're tempted to Kia instead.
 

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Not at all, if you want to establish a brand you offer more than others do, it's just common sense. Offer a long warranty and people know they have nothing to worry about for 7 years. The reliability of them just backs it up, it has taken them over a decade to have decent designs now that people might be tempted by.

Toyota offer 5 years and are widely renowned as one of the most reliable brands you can buy, offer 7 and you're tempted to Kia instead.
I often wonder about the situation with Jaguar Main Dealers who won't stock second hand Jaguars of a certain age
on their forecourt nor offer a warranty , I see Peter Vardy now establishing a Brand called Vardy Heritage and stocking
all the old Jaguars and charging a Premium for them
 

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With regards to the older Jaguars some of these cars were £50k+ when new, even though they’re not anymore they still command parts prices and repair costs of that cars original worth. Which probably why they’re at a premium price with Vardy heritage to cover a warranty if anything goes wrong with them.
 

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Manufacturers can only afford to offer a long warranty on their product if they have a reasonable expectation that they won't have to pay out on it. Thus if a car has a 7 year warranty you can be pretty sure it will be reliable. Of course they need to have a unique selling point but they aren't stupid, if they didn't believe their product would be reliable for seven years they wouldn't offer 7 years.
 

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with regards to the older jaguars some of these cars were £50k+ when new, even though they're not anymore they still command parts prices and repair costs of that cars original worth. Which probably why they're at a premium price with vardy heritage to cover a warranty( if anything)when everything goes wrong with them.
efa!

:-d

:-d
 

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Well no. Unless that warranty is transferable to the next person that buys that car there's really not much "risk" at all is how I would view it.

And then there's the t&c's attached to that 7 year warranty. Just what hoops do the manufacturers want you to jump through to maintain the car in a condition where they will honour the warranty?

I know of a few Hyundai' that have had clutch issues at really low mileage, one as low as 10,000 miles and those warranty claims have not been honoured. It happened to my daughters driving instructor. And it wasn't the car she was using as her school car. Through that experience she learned of a few other i20's with the same kind of issue.

I'dsuggest that as much as you think you are onto a good thing with these warranties, unless you intend keeping it for7 years, somewhere some Actuary will have figured the odds.

If you are daft enough to pay the premium for a new car, you are probably vain enough to want to buy another new car two or three years down the line is what I would suggest. And in that situation the risk of anyone ever claiming on the 7 year warranty is pretty slim if it has to be the original owner.

If it's a Lease, then that's even safer because that warranty will only have to last the three years the car is on lease.

Of course if the warranty is transferable then we are talking about a whole new matchbox full of spring loaded haddock.

But, I found this reasonably quickly...

"Exceptions: Hyundai and Kia

Although Hyundai and Kia are well known for offering the best powertrain warranties in the industry -- 10 years or 100,000 miles -- these legendary warranties aren't transferable to a new owner. Fortunately, the warranty doesn't become completely invalid when a new owner buys the car; it just changes to 5 years or 60,000 miles of powertrain coverage.
The change is an important one for used-car shoppers to know; many drivers interested in a reliable car will likely choose a Hyundai or Kia based solely on the excellent warranty coverage. Unfortunately, the bulk of that excellent coverage is only available to the first owner."

https://www.autotrader.com/car-tips/buying-a-car-is-the-factory-warranty-transferable-228454?rinno=1
 

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With regards to the older Jaguars some of these cars were £50k+ when new, even though they're not anymore they still command parts prices and repair costs of that cars original worth. Which probably why they're at a premium price with Vardy heritage to cover a warranty if anything goes wrong with them.
I don't know what warranty they offer Ian , I shall have a look
 
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Well no. Unless that warranty is transferable to the next person that buys that car there's really not much "risk" at all is how I would view it.

And then there's the t&c's attached to that 7 year warranty. Just what hoops do the manufacturers want you to jump through to maintain the car in a condition where they will honour the warranty?

I know of a few Hyundai' that have had clutch issues at really low mileage, one as low as 10,000 miles and those warranty claims have not been honoured. It happened to my daughters driving instructor. And it wasn't the car she was using as her school car. Through that experience she learned of a few other i20's with the same kind of issue.

I'dsuggest that as much as you think you are onto a good thing with these warranties, unless you intend keeping it for7 years, somewhere some Actuary will have figured the odds.

If you are daft enough to pay the premium for a new car, you are probably vain enough to want to buy another new car two or three years down the line is what I would suggest. And in that situation the risk of anyone ever claiming on the 7 year warranty is pretty slim if it has to be the original owner.

If it's a Lease, then that's even safer because that warranty will only have to last the three years the car is on lease.

Of course if the warranty is transferable then we are talking about a whole new matchbox full of spring loaded haddock.

But, I found this reasonably quickly...

"Exceptions: Hyundai and Kia

Although Hyundai and Kia are well known for offering the best powertrain warranties in the industry -- 10 years or 100,000 miles -- these legendary warranties aren't transferable to a new owner. Fortunately, the warranty doesn't become completely invalid when a new owner buys the car; it just changes to 5 years or 60,000 miles of powertrain coverage.
The change is an important one for used-car shoppers to know; many drivers interested in a reliable car will likely choose a Hyundai or Kia based solely on the excellent warranty coverage. Unfortunately, the bulk of that excellent coverage is only available to the first owner."

https://www.autotrader.com/car-tips/buying-a-car-is-the-factory-warranty-transferable-228454?rinno=1
Kia's 7 year warranty is transferable to future owners:

http://www.kia.com/uk/innovation/7-year-warranty/
 

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Just in passing as the OP mentioned Volvo...

It's very disappointing.

A friend's 1 year old Nissan Joke has no spare tyre, just a compressor and a can of glue if needed.

Putting that in will need a new tyre, €130 and €40 to clean up the rim.

I understand even Mercs don't have a spare wheel now, just a compressor, is this true?

Is the XC90 better equipped?

It's the only candidate which even slightly pulled my sleeve for a Next Car.

But mine won't be new.

Possibly a 4 year old.

.
 
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