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2005 XJ6 SE
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I've been following this forum for quite a while as you've all created a fabulous resource to help any X350 owner keep their Jag in half-decent condition. I've been meaning to start my own thread to contribute my own trials and tribulations, but being lazy, and having a thread on the car on another forum (booo!), I've never quite got around to it. Until now...

So, may I present my first Jaaag:





It's a 2005 3.0 petrol. I bought it with 42k miles on the clock and is currently around 55k.

It started life as a Jaguar management car (as many did), first real owner was a steel works owner in Sheffield when it didn't do many miles. Second owner was a property developer down in Caterham, with me being the third.

In the last two and a half years, I've done quite a bit of work on the car. MOT history was good, but there were many bits that needed doing.

To date, I've done (or had done) the following:
  • Replace Windscreen Wipers
  • New Cabin Filter
  • Cabin Heater Flush (didn't work)
  • Winter tyres & wheels from ebay
  • Ctek charger bought
  • Boot Mat
  • Air Con Recharged
  • MAF Sensor clean
  • Battery replaced
  • L/H mirror motor replaced
  • Drivers Inner Door seal (s/hand)
  • Engine Air Filter
  • Greased bonnet release cable
  • Checked front earthing studs. Replaced all.
  • Rear subframe cleaned, treated and sprayed with Bilt Hamber Dynax
  • Headlight & Sidelight bulbs upgraded
  • New discs & pads all around, aux drive belt, diff oil change, spark plugs and fuel filter fitted
  • Power steering fluid flushed
  • Gearbox oil changed
  • Boot gas struts replaced
  • Summer alloys refurbed and fitted with Uniroyal Rainsport 5s
  • Air suspension pump serviced
  • Upgraded indicator stalks
  • Replaced rear tie rods and drop links
  • Wiper modification to double sprayers on each wiper arm
  • Arnott Wabco Air Compressor & Relay (service above didn't work)
  • Painted Calipers and Brake Discs
  • R/H ABS sensor replaced
  • Main Beam Headlight bulbs replaced (Bulb Failure)
  • Stainless Steel Fuel Tank Straps fitted
  • Respray on Boot Lip, rear drivers-side door and lacquer peel on bumper.
  • Rear Caliper slider pin seized. Unseized & all others serviced.
  • New EBC Ultimax Brake Pads Fitted (previous new pads squealed at low speed)
  • ECM & gearbox reflash
  • Heater Matrix Replacement
  • New Winter tyres (Kleber Krissalp HP3 235 55/17) fitted
  • Replaced boot chrome trim for new one
  • Replaced grille & surround for a black mesh version
  • R/H rear ABS sensor replaced again (Cheap eBay one failed)
  • Suspension Refresh - Rear Upper & Lower Wishbones, Front Anti Roll Bar links, Front Drop Links, lower wishbones & Banana Arms, Front Tie Rods and rear Shock Bushes
  • Driveside cam cover seals replaced (oil leak),
  • NVH brace replaced,
  • Coolant flush, full geo & alignment
  • Replace Park Brake Motor & fix headlight wiring
  • Handbrake Cables
  • Lambda sensors replaced
  • Stripped, repainted and waxoyled front subframe, improved front undertray fitting
  • Resprayed front grille
  • Stripped and repainted lower rear subframe arms
  • Replace driver's window motor (old one failed)
So as you can see, I've done quite a bit of work. I do what I can myself, but the Jag Specialist in Donny does the difficult stuff and my local garage does the stuff which I can't do on the driveway.

My latest modification has been to create a footrest for my left foot. The carpet was beginning to look a bit worn:



Bit of CAD:



One modified Audi A2 footrest later:



Here's the resprayed grille in gunmetal, which just highlights the mesh ever-so-slightly (black made it disappear, and as its not a supercharged one, I don't want to be accused of mis-badging with the stainless steel version):



In hindsight, I should've bought the 4.2 (and seriously considered selling this one for a 4.2 several times), but given the work I've done to it, it'll be sticking around for quite a while, I think. I like the noise, the power isn't terrible (I keep telling myself), the mpg (35 at 70) and the handling. Keeping it going is sometimes frustrating, at other times rewarding. But I like driving something different. And it's been great for improving my skills...

The current to-do-list for this year includes: replace rear parking sensors (old ones on the blink), replace front cross brace (scabby) and a bit of bodywork tidying, refurb the winter wheels and replace the headlining (might last another year hopefully).

I'll try and keep this thread updated as and when I find something else broken or fix something. So that'll be next week then...

So there you go. I hope you enjoyed reading. Please let me know if you have any questions or want to see any more pics (I have quite a few).

All the best,

WP

 

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Very nice car you have there, can't beat the XJ6 such an underrated package IMO most jump straight to the V8 which is no bad thing but IMO for todays roads the 3.0 6 has more than enough power. ;)
 
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Congratulations; a very nice specimen indeed! I must admit that, while reading the portion of the thread about the left footrest, I scrolled to the second picture (which has the white cardboard template), and I thought that was the finished product. My first thought was that your idea of 'fixing up' the car is probably applying duct tape to the areas where the beer cans bounced off the body and chipped the paint.
 
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2005 XJ6 SE
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your kind words.

As I'm bored, I'll add some of the other work that I've done on it:

After the most recent MOT, the tester commented that the front subframe was looking a little scabby, so I decided to try and slow down the march of the tinworm:

Here it is before:





I tackled it with a sanding disc on a grinder (here it's shown part way through - it did get better than this, but I forgot to take a picture):



And finally painted with some chassis paint:





I'll apply dinitrol to it all when I've next got the undertray off. It's not perfect, but it should slow the rot down.

Other underbody work I've done is replace the NVH brace on the rear. Mine was looking scabby, especially the bit below where a large washer is tack welded on to the brace - a perfect rot spot:



So I bought a used one and had it blasted/powdercoated:



I then had some washers laser cut in 1mm stainless steel (place online which will laser cut anything to your dimensions, not even expensive):





It's been a great (and cheap-ish at around £60) improvement. On that note I've still got the old NVH brace if anyone would be interested.

Last year I also decided to do a pretty full suspension refresh. I was getting the occasional clunk over some rough roads even after replacing the track rods and drop links on the rear, plus I was getting a vibration through the wheel when breaking hard. Rather than replace bits piecemeal, I decided to renew pretty much all suspension components in one go. I sourced most bits from reputable sellers (eg. Berkshire Jag/First Line) and the painted all the components prior to fitting:



I then sold off all the old bits to recoup some of the cost. Benefits are that I know that all bushes are good. Vibration under braking has gone and no more occasional clunks on the rear. It wasn't cheap to do, but worth it IMHO.

Next up: Engine bay...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There was a slight oil weep on Bank 1 (I think it's called) on the engine. This was a perfect opportunity for a bit of tarting-up as part of fixing it. I bought a used cam cover (from an S-Type, taking a punt that it'd fit), and sanded it down/prepped it for paint:



Painted with crackle paint in my spray booth:



This was the first time that I'd used crackle finish paint. The finish wasn't as good as I'd like, but MOT/garage time was rapidly approaching and I didn't have time to re-do it.

As part of the work, lots of seals were replaced. It did fit though:



And how it looks all finished:



I was pretty pleased with that. As a bonus, the oil leak was fixed and I used the old cam cover as an ornament in my workshop...
 

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Good work, fix problem via unnecessary pimping and painting, fit right in here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Cheers FlatCap, having seen your posts, that's what I figured...

Where was I? Ah, yes - engine bay...

I've also been upgrading any bolts I can see to stainless steel:

Before:


After:


Anyone else anal enough to wash/dress wheelarches when swapping between winter and summer tyres? No? Just me then...







On that note, with winter tyres (Kleber Krissalp HP3), winter handling has been fine, with no grip issues:



Which leads me on to a question: My winter alloys (as shown in the above picture) need refurbing. I see that Alec has had his Daimler alloys done in Mercedes Himalayan Grey (and they look great). For mine, I'd like a slightly lighter shade of grey (but not silver). Anyone got any colour suggestions or a wheel colour chart? My google-fu is currently failing me... Any suggestions gratefully received.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
One job which I've been meaning to do for ages is replace the under-bonnet insulation. My one was well past it's best:



Removed:



New one fitted:



As with most things in life, Jag don't make my version of the under bonnet insulation any more, only the upgraded version with some different trim clips (which won't work on my bonnet). So to try and minimise future sagging, I also used some high temp spray adhesive to keep it in place. Only one chance to get it in the right place and I mostly did, within a couple of mm...

Then, with the bonnet sorted, I did a long-planned road trip!

Backstory (skip if you wish): My dad had always wanted to drive an HGV, so for his 70th birthday, I bought him an HGV driver experience. Not wanting to go with the usual Virgin/Red Letter day crap, I found a real HGV training company who did real experience days and promised to offer a much, much better experience. Only issue was that they were down in Devon, I was in York and my Dad was in North Wales. The Jaaag did the 900 odd miles beautifully. Even managed to get 37 mpg average for most of the trip.

First visit after picking up the old man was to the Fleet Air Arm Museum (excellent and well worth a visit!):





Then the next day on to the HGV experience:



SRTS were great (and I'd really recommend them if anyone else fancies the same experience). I'd booked for myself and my Dad to have a go, with back to back sessions. We were on Upottery airfield (of Band of Brothers fame) and had over two hours between us of driving, manoeuvring and reversing. My Dad loved it, but having just had COVID, I think he was glad to be back in the Jaaag to relax for the journey back to north Wales.

The next morning (Sunday), I drove back from north Wales to York. One of my favourite journeys ever, just because it was so quiet. The roads were deserted - I left at 7 on a Sunday morning and covered a journey which usually takes 3 hours 15 with traffic in under 2 hours 25. And because I didn't have to keep slowing down and speeding up avoiding all the congestion generated by middle-lane-morons, I averaged 34 mpg and 70 mph (given that the retards in the Welsh assembly have a fair bit of the A55 at limited at 40 at the moment, I was able to make up time elsewhere). It'll stay in my memory for a long time.

Now, looking at the above pic, the geo/ride height on the rear wheel looks a bit off. This bugged me, so today I had a look. I'd bought some stainless steel ride height sensor brackets off ebay a while back, but hadn't got round to fitting them.

Having jacked up the rear quarter, the mounting bracket was flexing quite a bit and well past it's best:



The mounting holes on the ride height sensor were also damaged:



Not wanting to spend £150 on a sensor and a load more on re-setting the ride height, a combination of bodgery and glue was employed to fix it. The old bracket mounting bolts were life expired, so not having any to hand, I made some out of M8 threaded rod, locknuts and permanent threadlock:



And fitted:



Starting the engine and moving the car saw the ride height rise by 15mm in that corner. I have to say I was dreading some sort of ride height error message, but all was ok thankfully.

I'm still not 100% convinced that all is well in terms of Geo, so I've booked in with Track Torque over in Tockwith to give everything a check-over.

I also replaced the bracket on the other side (wasn't as bad) and did my usual 'spray any corrosion with wax' thing:

Before:



And after:



I've also had my winter alloys powdercoated. They were looking on the scabby side and I'd been looking for a colour other than silver to have them refurbed in. I knew I wanted something darker, but not black. A poster on Pistonheads provided the inspiration in his Mclaren thread and I shamelessly copied his inspired BMW Ferric Grey 2 choice (mock up):



Looking to the future, I'm not sure how long my bodged ride height sensor bracket will last. When it fails, I have two choices:

1 - Replace all the ride height sensors (replacing one seems pointless as the remainder won't be far off letting go and I like to add reliability where possible) and have the ride height re-programmed (est around £600 as you need Jag SDD software to programme the new sensors).

or

2 - Rip out the air suspension and go with coliovers.

You may think I'm mad, but I reckon after selling the air struts/compressor, the coilovers will cost around the same as just replacing the sensors, never mind should one of the struts themselves let go. I've heard some good reports about the BC Racing Coliover kit, and wouldn't object to making the ride slightly firmer but I'd value anyone's real world input about coilovers and how well they'd potentially work on an old barge. They might be fine if you've just passed your test/not started shaving yet. But how will a middle-aged, fat bloke like me find them?

As always opinions/feedback always welcome.

Cheers!
 

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I'd stick with the original suspension if I were you. Nothing will ride like the air suspension and the ride / handling setup is a Jaguar strong point. They normally get it spot on.
Air suspension is not my area of expertise but I don't think the sensors are programmed, I think the height is calibrated so the system knows where it is.
I'd imagine that the values are reset and then you measure each corner and input that into the car so it can calibrate the ride flat, something I'd imagine a specialist could do in an hour. Or a forum member with SDD near you maybe.
 

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One job which I've been meaning to do for ages is replace the under-bonnet insulation. My one was well past it's best:



Removed:



New one fitted:



As with most things in life, Jag don't make my version of the under bonnet insulation any more, only the upgraded version with some different trim clips (which won't work on my bonnet). So to try and minimise future sagging, I also used some high temp spray adhesive to keep it in place. Only one chance to get it in the right place and I mostly did, within a couple of mm...

Then, with the bonnet sorted, I did a long-planned road trip!

Backstory (skip if you wish): My dad had always wanted to drive an HGV, so for his 70th birthday, I bought him an HGV driver experience. Not wanting to go with the usual Virgin/Red Letter day crap, I found a real HGV training company who did real experience days and promised to offer a much, much better experience. Only issue was that they were down in Devon, I was in York and my Dad was in North Wales. The Jaaag did the 900 odd miles beautifully. Even managed to get 37 mpg average for most of the trip.

First visit after picking up the old man was to the Fleet Air Arm Museum (excellent and well worth a visit!):





Then the next day on to the HGV experience:



SRTS were great (and I'd really recommend them if anyone else fancies the same experience). I'd booked for myself and my Dad to have a go, with back to back sessions. We were on Upottery airfield (of Band of Brothers fame) and had over two hours between us of driving, manoeuvring and reversing. My Dad loved it, but having just had COVID, I think he was glad to be back in the Jaaag to relax for the journey back to north Wales.

The next morning (Sunday), I drove back from north Wales to York. One of my favourite journeys ever, just because it was so quiet. The roads were deserted - I left at 7 on a Sunday morning and covered a journey which usually takes 3 hours 15 with traffic in under 2 hours 25. And because I didn't have to keep slowing down and speeding up avoiding all the congestion generated by middle-lane-morons, I averaged 34 mpg and 70 mph (given that the retards in the Welsh assembly have a fair bit of the A55 at limited at 40 at the moment, I was able to make up time elsewhere). It'll stay in my memory for a long time.

Now, looking at the above pic, the geo/ride height on the rear wheel looks a bit off. This bugged me, so today I had a look. I'd bought some stainless steel ride height sensor brackets off ebay a while back, but hadn't got round to fitting them.

Having jacked up the rear quarter, the mounting bracket was flexing quite a bit and well past it's best:



The mounting holes on the ride height sensor were also damaged:



Not wanting to spend £150 on a sensor and a load more on re-setting the ride height, a combination of bodgery and glue was employed to fix it. The old bracket mounting bolts were life expired, so not having any to hand, I made some out of M8 threaded rod, locknuts and permanent threadlock:



And fitted:



Starting the engine and moving the car saw the ride height rise by 15mm in that corner. I have to say I was dreading some sort of ride height error message, but all was ok thankfully.

I'm still not 100% convinced that all is well in terms of Geo, so I've booked in with Track Torque over in Tockwith to give everything a check-over.

I also replaced the bracket on the other side (wasn't as bad) and did my usual 'spray any corrosion with wax' thing:

Before:



And after:



I've also had my winter alloys powdercoated. They were looking on the scabby side and I'd been looking for a colour other than silver to have them refurbed in. I knew I wanted something darker, but not black. A poster on Pistonheads provided the inspiration in his Mclaren thread and I shamelessly copied his inspired BMW Ferric Grey 2 choice (mock up):



Looking to the future, I'm not sure how long my bodged ride height sensor bracket will last. When it fails, I have two choices:

1 - Replace all the ride height sensors (replacing one seems pointless as the remainder won't be far off letting go and I like to add reliability where possible) and have the ride height re-programmed (est around £600 as you need Jag SDD software to programme the new sensors).

or

2 - Rip out the air suspension and go with coliovers.

You may think I'm mad, but I reckon after selling the air struts/compressor, the coilovers will cost around the same as just replacing the sensors, never mind should one of the struts themselves let go. I've heard some good reports about the BC Racing Coliover kit, and wouldn't object to making the ride slightly firmer but I'd value anyone's real world input about coilovers and how well they'd potentially work on an old barge. They might be fine if you've just passed your test/not started shaving yet. But how will a middle-aged, fat bloke like me find them?

As always opinions/feedback always welcome.

Cheers!
I got the same on my X type wheels for the same reason
 

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Regarding suspension, the rear arrangement seems a carbon copy of the X202+ S types, I do wonder if a coil/shock setup from an S would go in place of the Air springs.



;)
 
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Hello all,

I've been following this forum for quite a while as you've all created a fabulous resource to help any X350 owner keep their Jag in half-decent condition. I've been meaning to start my own thread to contribute my own trials and tribulations, but being lazy, and having a thread on the car on another forum (booo!), I've never quite got around to it. Until now...

So, may I present my first Jaaag:





It's a 2005 3.0 petrol. I bought it with 42k miles on the clock and is currently around 55k.

It started life as a Jaguar management car (as many did), first real owner was a steel works owner in Sheffield when it didn't do many miles. Second owner was a property developer down in Caterham, with me being the third.

In the last two and a half years, I've done quite a bit of work on the car. MOT history was good, but there were many bits that needed doing.

To date, I've done (or had done) the following:
  • Replace Windscreen Wipers
  • New Cabin Filter
  • Cabin Heater Flush (didn't work)
  • Winter tyres & wheels from ebay
  • Ctek charger bought
  • Boot Mat
  • Air Con Recharged
  • MAF Sensor clean
  • Battery replaced
  • L/H mirror motor replaced
  • Drivers Inner Door seal (s/hand)
  • Engine Air Filter
  • Greased bonnet release cable
  • Checked front earthing studs. Replaced all.
  • Rear subframe cleaned, treated and sprayed with Bilt Hamber Dynax
  • Headlight & Sidelight bulbs upgraded
  • New discs & pads all around, aux drive belt, diff oil change, spark plugs and fuel filter fitted
  • Power steering fluid flushed
  • Gearbox oil changed
  • Boot gas struts replaced
  • Summer alloys refurbed and fitted with Uniroyal Rainsport 5s
  • Air suspension pump serviced
  • Upgraded indicator stalks
  • Replaced rear tie rods and drop links
  • Wiper modification to double sprayers on each wiper arm
  • Arnott Wabco Air Compressor & Relay (service above didn't work)
  • Painted Calipers and Brake Discs
  • R/H ABS sensor replaced
  • Main Beam Headlight bulbs replaced (Bulb Failure)
  • Stainless Steel Fuel Tank Straps fitted
  • Respray on Boot Lip, rear drivers-side door and lacquer peel on bumper.
  • Rear Caliper slider pin seized. Unseized & all others serviced.
  • New EBC Ultimax Brake Pads Fitted (previous new pads squealed at low speed)
  • ECM & gearbox reflash
  • Heater Matrix Replacement
  • New Winter tyres (Kleber Krissalp HP3 235 55/17) fitted
  • Replaced boot chrome trim for new one
  • Replaced grille & surround for a black mesh version
  • R/H rear ABS sensor replaced again (Cheap eBay one failed)
  • Suspension Refresh - Rear Upper & Lower Wishbones, Front Anti Roll Bar links, Front Drop Links, lower wishbones & Banana Arms, Front Tie Rods and rear Shock Bushes
  • Driveside cam cover seals replaced (oil leak),
  • NVH brace replaced,
  • Coolant flush, full geo & alignment
  • Replace Park Brake Motor & fix headlight wiring
  • Handbrake Cables
  • Lambda sensors replaced
  • Stripped, repainted and waxoyled front subframe, improved front undertray fitting
  • Resprayed front grille
  • Stripped and repainted lower rear subframe arms
  • Replace driver's window motor (old one failed)
So as you can see, I've done quite a bit of work. I do what I can myself, but the Jag Specialist in Donny does the difficult stuff and my local garage does the stuff which I can't do on the driveway.

My latest modification has been to create a footrest for my left foot. The carpet was beginning to look a bit worn:



Bit of CAD:



One modified Audi A2 footrest later:



Here's the resprayed grille in gunmetal, which just highlights the mesh ever-so-slightly (black made it disappear, and as its not a supercharged one, I don't want to be accused of mis-badging with the stainless steel version):



In hindsight, I should've bought the 4.2 (and seriously considered selling this one for a 4.2 several times), but given the work I've done to it, it'll be sticking around for quite a while, I think. I like the noise, the power isn't terrible (I keep telling myself), the mpg (35 at 70) and the handling. Keeping it going is sometimes frustrating, at other times rewarding. But I like driving something different. And it's been great for improving my skills...

The current to-do-list for this year includes: replace rear parking sensors (old ones on the blink), replace front cross brace (scabby) and a bit of bodywork tidying, refurb the winter wheels and replace the headlining (might last another year hopefully).

I'll try and keep this thread updated as and when I find something else broken or fix something. So that'll be next week then...

So there you go. I hope you enjoyed reading. Please let me know if you have any questions or want to see any more pics (I have quite a few).

All the best,

WP

Well done sir!
You have given me encouragement to continue with my project.
I have the same year and colour car but V8 3.6.
 
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On this point...

Air suspension is not my area of expertise but I don't think the sensors are programmed, I think the height is calibrated so the system knows where it is.

I replaced the front ride height sensor, which had failed. No reset of the system was needed, it adjusted immediately.
 
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