Mk 2 Restoration advice

homersimpson

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That doesn't look too bad, do you have any photos of the floors, rear seat pans and just the car overall to give an idea of condition?

I would strip it, put it on a rotiserrie if its strong enough (or reinforce like I have done with mine) then strip the underseal off it and have it media blasted.

That will show you what you have to work with and its amazing how much better they seem when they are bare metal, even the holes don't seem so bad!
 

decotaff

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Well, I'm a complete novice on all of it; no experience whatsoever but I'm determined to learn as much as I can. I lost my Dad last year and he loved the Mk 2, I've got it as a sort of tribute project and whatever happens, it'll keep him close as I work on it. He never had one, always thought it might be too flash for a labourer.
I've yet to strip the interior floor but suspect horrors; both sides of the rear seat pan, down through to the wheel arches are very open plan and I'm not convinced it's great going up the back either. Great for access to the box hangers though. The rear valance and tonneau panels have gone and the bumper bolts are immovable so I'm probably best just tearing it off to save time.
I will definitely post more pics but not sure if I should have a separate page for the horror story. Here's a pic of the front right jacking point having been compressed up into the rail. Joy. 2018-08-07 13.01.23 HDR.jpg 2019-07-13 11.10.19.jpg
 

homersimpson

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From what I have seen so far it all looks fixable, my main concern is with your comment that the floors need changing, is this the entire floor (which is not available as a panel) or just the front floor pan?

Its possible to hand make sections of floor but if the whole lot has gone then it could prove difficult to repair.
 

decotaff

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Well, I'm really heartened at your positive spin; though I note that you seem to be pretty handy all around and might be less phased than others. These photos show all I can see of the floor at the minute; I know the back edge that joins the lower part of the rear seat pan is certainly lace like on the off side but until I strip the underseal and the sticky soundproofing tar I won't really know. Thank for your interest; I do appreciate it and I wish I could weld the way you do! 2018-07-10 13.17.54.jpg 2019-07-13 12.03.25.jpg
 

homersimpson

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To be honest that doesn't look too bad, these cars can be quite surprising as the floor on mine was reasonably ok apart from the front floor pans and yet the chassis rails were hanging off at the front.

I taught myself to weld and its not a difficult skill to master but welding nice clean steel on a bench is completely different to welding a rusty car upside down. Clean the steel up to get rid of all paint/underseal/rust and the welding will be much better. Even the very best can't weld rust to rust!

A rotiserie is really useful and I bought one off ebay about 5 years ago (new) that is perfect and was at the time around £250.

If you don't have a welder I can highly recommend the Clarke range for a good hobby mig, I have a 150T which has been superseded by the 151TE I think. Mine has done several full restorations and the only things I have changed on it for this restoration is I have fitted a better torch as the standard one is a bit weedy and after a few cars started to give problems.

Dont be dishearted and the best advice I can give you is this:

1. Don't fall into the trap that a lot of people do and start by rebuilding the engine and running gear, spend loads on chrome and trim and then find the body is beyond their capabilities and a professional restoration is outside of their means. Start with the body, if you can do that the rest of it is childs play in comparison.

2. Don't get overwhelmed by the enormity of the task, split it down into manageable sections and aim for the end of that section not the end of the project, for example section 1 strip down, section 2 clean off all the underseal, section 3 shotblast and prime, section 4, repair floor etc.

3. Work on it when you want to, don't let it become a chore. Sometimes you want to work on it for a few hours every day, other times you won't touch it for weeks.

4. Scan ebay etc. to look for bargain body panels from other peoples failed restorations (obviously don't buy any that I want :))

5. Do plan ahead within reason and buy panels in time for when you need them, sometimes the suppliers don't have them in stock so its not always a case of ordering it today and fitting it at the weekend.

6. If you can go to the Jaguar Spares Days at Stoneleigh near Coventry (March and October), you can pick up bargains and also see some completed cars.

7. When restoring the bodyshell don't expect to achieve panel fit the same as a new car, the panel fit on them was highly variable and you will have to make some compromises.

Sorry I went on there a bit!
 

Henry_B

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**** all wrong with that..

Well some elbow grease will be required ;)

Not a patch "pun intended" on my old Roller which is transparent in all the wrong places ;)
 

decotaff

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Oh, not at all; I'm more grateful than I can say for your advice. I'm very much in it for the journey at the moment and not the destination; I'll learn what I can and take the victories when they come, however small. Your restoration thread is a great motivation for me and I'll be watching closely and probably picking brains as I go along.

I'm going to strip it as much as I can and then go on as you suggest, the interior is out, boot, bonnet, front doors, windscreens etc; I've left the rear doors in as I guessed they'd be useful for holding alignment. I'm now working through the Haynes steps in order to remove the engine and gearbox and then, hopefully, it will be light enough to raise without endangering it too much.

What is the best way to strip the soundproofing tar/pitch stuff from the interior?, I'm thinking heat gun and scraper at the minute.

Thanks again.
 

homersimpson

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Oh, not at all; I'm more grateful than I can say for your advice. I'm very much in it for the journey at the moment and not the destination; I'll learn what I can and take the victories when they come, however small. Your restoration thread is a great motivation for me and I'll be watching closely and probably picking brains as I go along.

I'm going to strip it as much as I can and then go on as you suggest, the interior is out, boot, bonnet, front doors, windscreens etc; I've left the rear doors in as I guessed they'd be useful for holding alignment. I'm now working through the Haynes steps in order to remove the engine and gearbox and then, hopefully, it will be light enough to raise without endangering it too much.

What is the best way to strip the soundproofing tar/pitch stuff from the interior?, I'm thinking heat gun and scraper at the minute.

Thanks again.

Hi,

I would also leave the front doors on for the moment as it will give you an early indication if it starts to sag/bend, there is always some slight resistance to the doors when the car is off its wheels but it shouldn't be much. If the door opens and then won't close without major force you might have the start of a problem that needs to be headed off.

Best of luck!
 

wearlej

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A rotiserie is really useful and I bought one off ebay about 5 years ago (new) that is perfect and was at the time around £250.

Hey Homer! Just out of curiosity how much space do you need to use one of these rotisseries? I'm guessing it's quite a bit? Cheers
 

cass3958

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I used a rotisserie when I rebuilt my S Type and it is now holding my Ford Anglia during its rebuild. The rotisserie sits about 9 inches to a foot longer than the car at each end but does not affect the width. The car rotates on the rotisserie and will go completely upside down which is great for doing any welding to the underside of the car. I would say that you would need a double sized garage for width so it can rotate and you can walk around it. I would also say you needed an extra two foot on the height of a normal garage as the car rotates on its centre line which is just below the level of the windows so to get the car on its side it has to be over half the width of the car off the ground with a bit of room. The S TYpe and Mk2 are both around 5 foot six inches wide so you would need about 7 foot ceiling height to be comfortable.
 
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