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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not of course the aluminium bodywork, but rear suspension parts plus a couple of struts at the front. All are thick bits of metal and the rust is superficial, at least for now. I had a quote for stripping it all down and having all the parts powder coated, then reassembled with new bushes, but at over £4500 I need a cheaper solution. My thought is that as I know a mechanic with a lift. He could degrease, wire brush, paint with a chemical rust converter (Kurust?) and paint with black Hammerite or perhaps bitumen paint. I know all sides of every part will not be accessible but it should keep the rust at bay. Does that sound like a good idea, and what have others done? Has anyone found a specialist they can recommend for treating rust on our cars?
 

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S Type 3.0 SE X206 Radiance Red
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There is no reason why it couldn't be wire brushed until clean steel is exposed, a good rust converter "bilt hamber hydrate 80" and then painted with a rust resistant coating like Por 15.

Kurust is terrible stuff, absolutely pointless. basically anything hammerite is garbage, it just hides the rot and allows moisture and road salt behind and the only time you know of anything serious is when the underseal falls off and leaves a hole behind!

If I were to have subframes removed, I'd have them galvanised, or painted with an epoxy based paint, powdercoat isn't fantastic.
 

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2006 XK Convertible 4.2 N.A., Indigo Blue over Ivory/Slate Blue
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Not of course the aluminium bodywork, but rear suspension parts plus a couple of struts at the front. All are thick bits of metal and the rust is superficial, at least for now. I had a quote for stripping it all down and having all the parts powder coated, then reassembled with new bushes, but at over £4500 I need a cheaper solution. My thought is that as I know a mechanic with a lift. He could degrease, wire brush, paint with a chemical rust converter (Kurust?) and paint with black Hammerite or perhaps bitumen paint. I know all sides of every part will not be accessible but it should keep the rust at bay. Does that sound like a good idea, and what have others done? Has anyone found a specialist they can recommend for treating rust on our cars?
Hi Norman

I had my sub-frame attended to last year by my local Jaguar indi; here's the thread that I posted at that time.

I know that AWJ, being in North Staffordshire, is a long way from you. However, after I had had the work on the car featured in Jaguar Driver magazine, a fellow member brought his XKR-S 4.2 over from Lincolnshire to use AWJ's services.

Oh, and I paid just under half of what you've been quoted for all the work listed in my post, (wheels & tyres included), so I would shop around, if I were you. You could stick with your mechanic, but the secret to any paint finish having longevity is the preparation. The reason why I liked AWJ's approach to my rear subframe (!?) is that they stripped it down and sandblasted it - that gives any well-applied paint finish an excellent chance of durability. Wire brushing might leave an incompletely prep'd surface meaning that the dreaded brown stuff would be popping through way too soon.

But definitely shop around; £4,500 equals a good many cases of reds 🍷😊
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
AWJ sound good but are a long way from me. I will have to put things on hold as I have just heard that my long awaited heart valve replacement (TAVI valve) is going to be done next week, after which I won't be allowed to drive for a month, so I am going to SORN the Jag today. I found this webpage which claims that rust converters are not a good idea. Why you should never use rust converter
My only experience of them is that Kurust produced a nice black finish on a lightly rusted drilling machine that had been kept in a damp garage, and that rust has not re-appeared. I think that when I can drive again I will talk to AWJ and any other companies that forum members recommend. I could also take the car to my friendly local mechanic so that we can both have a good look underneath and decide what is needed. He services our other cars and will be quite willing to let me get underneath the Jag.
 

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... I found this webpage which claims that rust converters are not a good idea. Why you should never use rust converter
My only experience of them is that Kurust produced a nice black finish on a lightly rusted drilling machine that had been kept in a damp garage, and that rust has not re-appeared. I think that when I can drive again I will talk to AWJ and any other companies that forum members recommend ...
Interesting link - thank you!

I'd be very interested to know what the military use, if anything. In my working life as a mechanical design engineer I was involved in several projects where my employer was bidding to supply stuff to the MoD, and the MoD always struck me as keen to test everything impartially and very thoroughly.

They were spending public money, not their own, so they were less interested in trying to save money than in acquiring stuff which worked and was reliable. In a combat situation you're not interested in cost, just survival, and therefore you need reliable kit which you know will always work, not necessarily stuff which is 'cutting edge', trendy, fashionable, looks good or is heavily promoted.

I was also involved in the design and testing of products for the aerospace industry, and much the same applied there. Reliability was a much greater consideration than cost.
 

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Keep in mind the guy who wrote the rust convertor article is selling his own service so it's not impartial. All I will say is having used dinitrol ml cavity wax it has always worked for me keeping my Landy chassis in shape. Externally I use a thinned down black waxoyl over chassis paint and I top it up every few years and again no complaints so far. I did my xk rear subframe with a cup brush, then treated with Fertan, followed by a few thin coats of hammerite smooth sprayed on after thinning with 2k thinner. Most issues with hammerite and undercoatings in general are due to putting it on too thick so it cracks and flakes. I then sprayed the inside with Dinitrol ML and the outside, after fitting it back onto tje car with Lanoguard as an additional barrier. TBH its probably overkill, if it is sprayed with something like lanoguard or a thinned down waxoyl regularly it would stop the surface rust progressing at that, just not as pretty as being stripped and painted.

Unless its really bad you could juat give it a good steam clean and then get it sprayed underneath with a probe attachement to get into all the nooks amd crannies.

Also lookup Krown protection, very highly rated in Canada and they have a place in the West Midlands.
 

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I have used Lanolin on my cars for the last 10 years and I’m very happy with it. Easy on. DIY and it stops the allready rusty parts to envolve and prevent new rust. And it is enviromentally friendly as it is chemical free
 

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I have used Lanolin on my cars for the last 10 years and I’m very happy with it. Easy on. DIY and it stops the allready rusty parts to envolve and prevent new rust. And it is enviromentally friendly as it is chemical free
Was gonna try Lanolin in the future as it seems easy to apply? , take it youd recommend it?
 

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I have used Lanolin on my cars for the last 10 years and I’m very happy with it. Easy on. DIY and it stops the allready rusty parts to envolve and prevent new rust. And it is enviromentally friendly as it is chemical free
Haven't gotten my car yet but doing some research into things and I'm thinking if it's always been garaged the underbody should be in good shape, but yes, the lanolin treatment every year or two sounded like a good move. I doubt i will have much rust at first but I'm thinking about long term preservation already.
 
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