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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems that there has been a mixup with the oil cans - the right oil for my petrol (2005, 2.5V6, 150 000 km) Jag is Castrol EDGE 0W-30 A5/B5, but instead it was filled with Castrol Edge FST Titanium 5W30 LongLife. It is actually a ACEA C3 oil with low saps for DPF diesel cars. Other specifications include - MB-Approval 229.31/229.51, Porsche C30, VW 504.00/507.00 (no ford/jag specifications).

Car has driven approx 1500 km after the change, no ill effects, maybe a little higher fuel consumption, but it is probably (partly) due to lower temps outside. Oil is maybe a bit darker than usual (higher detergent content in the oil?). Other than that - perfectly fine.

- Should I drain it immediatly?
- Can I keep it until the next oil change (or change it earlier)?

Thank you for any kind of input on this issue.
 

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Everywhere I've read says 5w30 oil, not 0w 30? if your unhappy change it again.
 

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Taken from the net, not my own information.

A/B: gasoline and diesel engine oilsACEA A1/B1 Category is removed with the ACEA 2016 Oil Sequences. From ACEA 2012: Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use at extended drain intervals in gasoline engines and car & light van diesel engines specifically designed to be capable of using low friction low viscosity oils with a high temperature / high shear rate viscosity of 2.6 mPa*s for xW/20 and 2.9 to 3.5 mPa.s for all other viscosity grades. These oils are unsuitable for use in some engines. Consult owner manual or handbook if in doubt.
ACEA A3/B3 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil intended for use in Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & Diesel Engines and/or for extended drain intervals where specified by the engine manufacturer, and/or for year-round use of Low Viscosity Oils, and/or for severe operating conditions as defined by the Engine Manufacturer.
ACEA A3/B4 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil intended for use in Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & DI Diesel Engines, but also suitable for applications described under A3/B3.
ACEA A5/B5 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil intended for use at extended Drain Intervals in Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & Diesel Engines designed to be capable of using Low Viscosity Oils with HTHS Viscosity of 2.9 to 3.5 mPa*s. These Oils are unsuitable for use in certain Engines - consult vehicle-OEM's owner's manual/handbook in case of doubt.
C: Catalyst compatibility oilsNote: These Oils will increase the DPF/GPF and TWC life and maintain the Vehicle's Fuel Economy.
Warning: Some of these Categories may be unsuitable for use in certain Engine Types - consult the vehicle- OEM's owner's manual/handbook in case of doubt.

ACEA C1 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil with Lowest SAPS-Level, intended for use as catalyst compatible Oil at extended Drain Intervals in Vehicles with all Types of modern Aftertreatment Systems and High Performance Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & DI Diesel Engines that are designed to be capable of using Low Viscosity Oils with a minimum HTHS Viscosity of 2.9 mPa*s.
ACEA C2 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil with Mid SAPS-Level, intended for use as catalyst compatible Oil at extended Drain Intervals in Vehicles with all Types of modern Aftertreatment Systems and High Performance Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & DI Diesel Engines that are designed to be capable of using Low Viscosity Oils with a minimum HTHS Viscosity of 2.9 mPa*s.
ACEA C3 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil with Mid SAPS-Level, intended for use as catalyst compatible Oil at extended Drain Intervals in Vehicles with all Types of modern Aftertreatment Systems and High Performance Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & DI Diesel Engines that are designed to be capable of using Oils with a minimum HTHS Viscosity of 3.5 mPa*s.
ACEA C4 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil with Low SAPS-Level, intended for use as catalyst compatible Oil at extended Drain Intervals in Vehicles with all Types of modern Aftertreatment Systems and High Performance Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & DI Diesel Engines that are designed to be capable of using Oils with a minimum HTHS Viscosity of 3.5 mPa*s.
ACEA C5 Stable, stay-in-grade Engine Oil with Mid SAPS-Level, for further improved Fuel Economy, intended for use as catalyst compatible Oil at extended Drain Intervals in Vehicles with all Types of modern Aftertreatment Systems and High Performance Passenger Car & Light Duty Van Gasoline & DI Diesel Engines that are designed to be capable and OEM-approved for use of Low Viscosity Oils with a minimum HTHS Viscosity of 2.6 mPa*s.
 

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I believe the important numbers to look for are the spec. For example, for mine it is WSS M2C 934 B (this won't be correct for yours as mine is a diesel). This is usually found in the handbook. As long as the oil matches the spec number you are ok. If a different oil has been put in I doubt it will do any serious damage but as others have suggested it might be best to change it for peace of mind.
 

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A difficult one! Sure it does not exactly meet spec but the C3 oil is very much like the oil that the Duratec V6 engines were designed for. The manual for the original S-Types suggests a basic, normal HTHS oil. It is not a Diesel-only spec. I've been using a high-spec GM Dexos2 C3 oil in mine for years and it still runs "like new". The loss in fuel efficiency is nothing compared to that caused by the wider tyres it now runs on :)

Later in life the lower HTHS was used to reduce fuel consumption (maybe with a little trade off on engine life, who knows).

The 0W- or 5W- part is not relevant at our ambient temps. The 0W- oil may be a bit thinner at startup which means it will get around the engine faster but I doubt it is much of a hitter.

I would not replace that oil early as to me the only trade off is a little increased fuel consumption but change it if it really worries you as it is a stress you don't need to have. Listening for things about to go wrong is no fun :)

EDIT: From Total http://www.totalspecialties.com/engine-oils/the-quartz-innovation.html

HTHS Viscosity Specifications

HTHS stands for High Temperature - High Shear viscosity. For OEMs, the differentiation between "high-HTHS" and "low-HTHS" can have a significant impact on your engine. Carmakers will recommend the use of either "high-HTHS" or "low-HTHS" engine oils. Drivers should refer to their Owner's Manual or the Car Manufacturer's Oil Specification to find which is recommended for your vehicle.

For example, within the popular 5W-30 viscosity category, the recommendations from carmakers will vary. Generally, "low-HTHS" oils are recommended to get better fuel economy, but only if the engine parts can take it. Using a "lowHTHS" 5W-30 oil will cause premature wear in an engine needing a "high-HTHS" 5W-30 oil. For better protection, generally, "high-HTHS" oils are recommended as they are able to protect against wear even in an engine where a "low-HTHS" 5W30 is recommended.
So, going from ACEA A5/B5 to ACEA C3 would appear to be fairly harmless or even advantageous, everything else being similar.
 

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I wouldn't bother with Castrol Edge in future. It's more expensive than you need. I've always used Castrol Magnatec 5W30, which is fine. The A1, A3, A5 nomenclature seems to reflect the passage of time - I don't think you can get A1 any more, and I haven't seen A3 recently. I've got A5 in stock for my next oil change, as being the latest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
digging a bit deeper and having driven approx 6000 km, no problems and car runs happily. Ford oil spec is indeed on a lower end of spectrum. Also - Castrol Edge is indeed a bit over the reasonable for such car, going with Castrol Magnatec on the next oil change
 

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Hello all,

consider Juan Manuel Fangio topped up the oil level in one of his cars wiith water during a race. He knew he had a better chance of finishing with a mixture of oil and water than leaving the oil level low. This was in his early days of racing in Argentina.

Alec
 

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I've been using a high-spec GM Dexos2 C3 oil in mine for years and it still runs "like new".
I have seen many BMW owners use this oil too with no detrimental affects what so ever :wink:
 

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I've been using Magnatec ever since it came out, on the basis that it's said to stick to your moving bits for longer, so better for infrequent use. In truth I don't know how you'd ever tell if one oil is better than another. Obviously, if an oil is absolutely useless, you'd notice when the engine seizes up, but shades of difference in between are unmeasurable unless you've got some serious scientific equipment. Maybe time taken for the oil to turn black is a measure.
 

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I've used Shell Helix 5w30 in all my cars, petrol and derv. It's never had any real problems, I think the bigger issue is the quality of oil filter? I only ever use Genuine Jaguar or MANN for that.

Every 6,000 miles or when it starts to drop on the dip stick, (only when I drive it with gusto). But that is the important bit, you do need to keep an eye on the level.
 

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So here we go & have just found this thread, but I thought you may be interested on my take. I am a process engineer in the oil & gas industry so the engine oil is somewhat of a passion I wanted to share. Its also the life blood of your engine. Good quality oil in & changed when required to promote a car that lasts & is reliable. Technology over the past 10 years has come on leaps & bounds; the significant difference 20 years ago was that there were only mineral engine oils (ie) ones that were sourced from the ground with some blending to produce a lubricant. Now the shift is to man made, fully synthetic. Made up of I-V. All this plus the info above & much more is explained in the attached, Amazing Engine Oils. Read this & you will learn a lot. I don't own a jaguar, my father did; however the thread above explains that there is little difference & little requirement to go to a 0W/30. The first number by the letter, standing for winter is the cold cranking viscosity class. The lower the numbers the thinner the oil is. The second number is viscosity @ 100°C. So little to no difference between this & a 5W/30. The key is the class & if it is a low SAPS; has to be used for DPF's to avoid poison & early end of life, otherwise very costly repair bills. Each manufacturer will have its own coding. I use the VW 5W/30 504.00/507.00 (Long-life) & again there is another attachment explaining this. Amazing engine oils, that I see has been deleted due to file size, I will add the link. Different grades & OEM specs do overlap, so don't get too hung up over this! Just choose a decent oil & I find the VW oil will actually provide amazing running engines across the families 4 different car models & fuels types. Rather than chopping & changing, as the A5/B5 grades in effect is a C2 grade. This overlaps into the C3 grade.
A key point is to ensure that if a car demands a 0W/20, then don't think a 5w/30 will suffice. Like I say, UK is a relatively temperate climate. Annual ambient conditions do not swing like Northern Canada where a seasonal difference of 60-80°C is experienced & 0W is a must. UK 5W is more than adequate, as 0W will bring little or no benefit, but cost more!
The 2nd number needs to match, as this is viscosity at engine running temperature.
The synthetics will promote cleanliness & reduce deposits, thus creating a more efficient combustion burn. Less emissions, greater efficiency & power. Also the API class: The SN is much improved compare to the SN. Have a read.

The development of engine oil is not a cheap or quick road, from 10 years ago.

Enjoy,
Paul
 

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