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I saw the BAe Mosquito several times before its fatal crash and it was a lovely sight and sound. I hope this project is financially viable, but I have to say in the current financial climate I don't think it is. :(

Building a Mosquito from scratch is a major undertaking since the fuselage was built in a mould, although Avspecs in New Zealand -- Welcome to Avspecs Ltd - is planning to get their FB 26 flying this September after about 10 years of restoration. Interestingly the Avspecs aircraft uses a brand new airframe built by Glyn Powell, a retired enthusiast in a "shed" in his back garden. (if you can get a copy there is a good write up in "Aeroplane monthly" march this year) Now the moulds are available the major components can be fabricated from new but a lot of other parts still need to be found and as The People's Mosquito project's base airframe is one that was buried in 1949 following a crash and fire which destroyed the majority of the wooden aircraft there can be very little of even the metal bits in a usable condition.
Ian C
 

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The Dakota was extensively used by the RAF during the war so is probably appropriate on that ground. However I believe the main reason that the Dakota is part of the BBMF is more for pilot training on large, multiple piston engined period aircraft to minimise the hours on the Lancaster's airframe. For the same reason the BBMF also has a DHC Chipmunk trainer on strength for the single seater pilots.

I guess one of the main reasons that they never had a Mosquito is that since it was withdrawn from service in the 50s few have been available in flying condition. Even those well preserved in Museums could never be put back in flying condition as it is very difficult, probably impossible, to check whether the wooden structure is still properly glued together.
 

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I was watching a program (Coast) on tv a night or two back... In the dark days of WWII Britain desperately needed ballbearings from Sweden which by that time was encircled by Nazi held territory. The solution was twofold... a fleet of fast MGBs and a squadron of superfast mosquitoes. Both boats and aircraft specially adapted to carry cargoes of ball bearings. An aspect of WWII history that I simply never knew about.

Mike
 

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Having spoken to the guys at Coningsby (home of the BBMF), the reason they have a Dakota is that when the memorial flight is away for a weekend airshow, spares, fitters etc and misc parts are carried in the Dak....
If anyone is close to Bradwell in Essex, have a look at the memorial erected to the mossie crews - it consists of a mossie buried nose down up to its wing chords - absolute disgrace.
Anyone going to the DeHavilland museum for the Pathfinders day next month?
 

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Having spoken to the guys at Coningsby (home of the BBMF), the reason they have a Dakota is that when the memorial flight is away for a weekend airshow, spares, fitters etc and misc parts are carried in the Dak....
If anyone is close to Bradwell in Essex, have a look at the memorial erected to the mossie crews - it consists of a mossie buried nose down up to its wing chords - absolute disgrace.
Anyone going to the DeHavilland museum for the Pathfinders day next month?
Made a point of viewing this memorial sometime ago, it's not a full size Mossie in the ground, the Mossies were flying intruder raids from Bradwell, lot of Aussies, New Zealanders and a few South Africans "bought" it flying over France.

Fantastic aircraft, particularly when you realise that it was a fighter bomber with speed superiority but could carry a bigger bomb load than a B17.
Wonderfully versatile, built to a DeHavilland spec, to paraphrase Goering, "The British have all the resources aluminum and steel and build a superb aircraft out of wood, at the end of the war, I'll buy a British radio knowing that it will never go wrong!"..
If she wasn't carrying a big bomb load she could bring you home on one of the superb Merlins..

If you get a chance, have a look on UTube at the Mossie fitted with the 57mm Autocannon... amazing....IMHO British engineering at it's ingenious best!

B
Just a further clarification...as great as the Mossie was, you don't want to be flying one in India or the Far East as the glue tended to come unstuck (Temp/Humidity, who knows?), sounds daft but there were a few unexplained accidents and rumblings that some of the production quality wasn't that great on a few mks....
 
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