X-Type Estate glass rear screen damper change

csteffan

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Tauberbischofsheim, Germany
Last saturday I decided to change the rear screen dampers on our X-Type Estate, they had completely failed.
I used Lesjoförs (Swedish quality), around 18 GBP each, this is the order number (Jaguar part number was C2S23550):
IMG_5948.JPG
This is the look of the unwrapped damper:
IMG_5949.JPG
First step was to remove the two retainers of the safety net (simple crosshead screws):
IMG_5950.JPG
Then you should remove the rubber seal around the upper part of the boot (Jaguar says to renew this everytime when removed, don't know why!?); I left it in place:
IMG_5951.JPG
Carefully remove the d-pillar trims
IMG_5952.JPG
and take care for the two white clips each side, they're very brittle (Jaguar # C2S40356, around 2 GBP each):
IMG_5953.JPG
Now it gets exciting: carefully push the headlining down and feel around for the dampers mounting.
IMG_5954.JPG
You cannot see anything (unless you remove the complete headlining), the end of the damper sits on a ball-shaped head, secured by a steel clip (compare it to the new one). The steel clip can be levered from the front or back side, anyway a strong, thin-bladed screwdriver is very useful:
IMG_5956.JPG
After the clip is removed (which was the most difficult part), the damper's end can easily be token from the ball head.
At the other end the damper is held by a plastic bolt and also a plastic securing clip. Remove the clip
IMG_5957.JPG
and push the bolt out. Both parts together:
IMG_5959.JPG
Next step I did was to free the big black rubber around the damper, pushed it inside and removed altogether over the headlining:
IMG_5960.JPG
Now the rubber was cleaned
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as the area around the opening was:
IMG_5962.JPG
Gave the rubber a good smear of Vaseline all around
IMG_5963.JPG
and sprayed some cavity sealant in to the opening:
IMG_5964.JPG
After that I pushed the rubber to the new damper, which has a retaining notch. A little bit of grease into the ball button
IMG_5965.JPG
and the complete damper/rubber seal can be pushed through the opening. Maybe you have to wiggle it to the inside to fit (use your fingers), the head easily clicks on the ball-shaped head, secured by the steel clip.
IMG_5966.JPG
Finally some grease to the plastic
bolt and push it in place.
IMG_5968.JPG
Maybe you'll have to position the fork to fit by the help of a large, flat-bladed screwdriver.
The plastic securing clip on the other side shouldn't be forgotten, and the job's nearly done:
IMG_5967.JPG
All you have to do is to fix the d-pillar trims (good luck!), place the rubber seal in the correct way (easy) and finally the safety-net retainers (also easy).
Job done.
But be careful: there are sharp edges all around the headlining and under the roof, and the headlining itself is made of/with glass-fibre, which can damage your skin. I did not use gloves, as most of the job is in the darkness and I needed the sense of touch.
IMG_5969.JPG
On the right side of the car you'll find some cable wirings and the rear screen washer hose between roof and headlining. These all limit your workspace.
Complete time around two hours for both sides without any guydance. This job is absolutely do-able (even with my large hands!), and the rear screen doesn't fall on to my head any more, also the boot opens willingly now. My mouse (wife) moans about the boot needing more force to close (OMG!), and she sais she'd never use the rear screen:confused:.
Good luck to all copying this project!
Regards
Christof
 

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